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Of Fenders and Gibsons, GE Smith and Eric Clapton

Where’s there’s music and wine, there will be dancing

New moon blots out much of the sun in ­Chesapeake Country

New stamp carries important message

Christmas in April starts now

This bee drills into wood and flowers

  Dear Bay Gardener We planted Roma’s, Big Boys and Beefsteaks, all Burpees. Garden is in full sun until late afternoon. I get a soil test done each year from Penn State. In addition, I added about four bags of manure when I tilled. When we planted, we used a mix of mostly dirt with a bit of manure and peat moss. I added the soil recommendation of 10-10-10, and just about two weeks ago I added maybe a tablespoon and a half in a two-foot circle around the plants. Up until one week ago...
  Dear Bay Weekly:   Thanks for the heads up about the coming electoral season in your Letter from the Editor, “Signs of the Times” [July 15]. I’ve enjoyed the dueling yard signs in my neighborhood over the years during election time, both as spectator and participant.   In my days of working for Alaskan politicians, trinket giveaways were also part of campaigning. Sewing kits, playing cards, key chains and berry buckets — all sporting the candidates...
Dear Bay Weekly: What a beautiful story “Hearing Hope in the Melody” [July 15]. The musicians Carolyn Surrick, Sue Richards and Ginger Hildebrand deserve special recognition for their devotion to the wounded GI’s. Reading their story brought a tear to my tired old GI eyes (Vietnam).  Thank you for sharing. This article should be printed by the national media. Also, Diana Beechener did a great job telling their story. Job well done, Bay Weekly.    –Jerry...
  Bill Burton wanted a windmill in his backyard. Not as decoration, and certainly not to chase away birds, for Bill was their dedicated friend. No, he wanted windmills because he believed our future depends on them as one no-longer optional choice we must make to save our planet. “Should we persist in ignoring global warming, there’s more than a good chance that future generations won’t be able to make up for time lost.” Burton wrote those words in his Earth Day...
  Botanical gardens have always had difficulty keeping plant viruses out of their orchid collections. While working at the U.S. Botanical Garden in Washington, D.C., Carol Allen often noticed small indentations or notches on the aerial roots of orchids in the conservatory. One evening, she saw cockroaches crawling over the roots. Could they be the culprits spreading viruses between contaminated plants and newly arrived virus-free plants? Always before, virus transmission between plants had...

Week 18: He — or She — Is a Big Baby

Junior is getting really big. He’s over half the size of his mother now, and is working his father hard to satisfy his ever-increasing appetite for fish, which his mother still feeds him one bite at a time. He was awkwardly stretching his wings out the other day; it won’t be long now before his mother will have him flapping his wings to develop his flight muscles. In case you wondered, even in hot weather, ospreys don’t need to drink water. They get enough from the fresh fish...

Within the Order of the Eastern Star, jewelry store owner Jean Chance wields power to do good

For 40 years, Jean Chance has been the grand dame of W. R. Chance Jewelers on Main Street, Annapolis, the family business started by her husband’s father more than 60 years ago. Now, she’s gained a grander title: Worthy Grand Dame of the Grand Chapter of Maryland Order of the Eastern Star. The Order of the Eastern Star is a tradition from her side of the family; her grandparents, father, aunts and uncles all belonged to the fraternal organization now numbering one million members in...

Forgetting that maxim, this dummy went home hungry

Fish are Biting Rockfish are getting even more finicky in the heat and have developed an almost exclusive preference for spot. Unfortunately, those spot have become elusive especially in the sizes best for live-lining, five to six inches. If you can find them, you’ll get your stripers. Croaker are roaming about in good numbers and ever-increasing sizes and taking shrimp and bloodworms. Perch have now begun to swarm the shallows, and big ones can be found there...

The spate of Code Orange days have our plants gasping for breath

A Bay Weekly reader asked me why his Heritage birch was dropping its leaves despite the fact that it was under irrigation. The answer was simple: air pollution. The Heritage birch is a clone of river birch, and river birch trees are extremely sensitive to ozone and sulfur dioxide. Since the middle of June, we have experienced several days of Code Orange, and in early July we have also experienced Code Red. This means that air pollutants are sufficiently high to affect humans, and the foliage of...

Bumbling villainy meets willful cuteness in this smart and charming cartoon.

Mastermind of villainy Gru (Steve Carell: Date Night) is annoyed when some new bad guy on the scene steals his villainous thunder. To climb back on top he aims to steal the moon, and all that’s missing from his master plan is one critical piece. To get at it he adopts three little orphan girls: Margo, Edith and Agnes. Their want for family proves formidable, though, and Gru swerves through strange territory as the dream heist and fatherhood come into conflict.   So plays the...