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Hiking the Appalachian Trail prepared him for his next journey as a Navy SEAL

World’s biggest crab feast August 7

Help Bailey find his way home

It doesn’t need to be the Appalachian Trail to push you forward

Recreational anglers deserve their fair share of the catch

Success is a heavy burden

bayweekly.com is not the Emerson College Lady Gaga lipdub. (Find that link below, in Correspondence.) Considerably fewer than a million people read Bay Weekly online. Nor are we the viral video How to Wrap a Cat for Christmas, which brought the Hartford Current 3,800,442 viewers on You Tube. (See for yourself at http://www.courant.com/news/breaking/sns-viral-video-wrap-a-cat,0,135253....) But we’ve got enough viewers to crash the server that hosted Bay Weekly’s own web site. That...

12 calendars to spruce up the march of time

In the pages of this illustrious paper, I get credited only as staff writer occasionally. For the most part, I’m Bay Weekly’s Calendar Editor. I’m the one who tells you what’s happening in Bay Country every day of every week. It’s my job to rely on calendars, to get the dates right and to plan ahead. I look at a calendar every day. Every. Single. Day. To do my job, you really need a good calendar. John Wayne watches over my desk, a strong black-and-white image to...

December’s sky offers rewards for those willing to brave the elements

The sun sets this week a little before 4:45, and as the sky darkens, Jupiter appears high in the south-southeast. Aside from the moon at this time, Jupiter is one of the brightest objects in the heavens until setting due west at midnight. The planet stands out all the more amid the dim water constellations Aquarius, Capricornus, Pisces and Pisces Austrinus, which holds the nearest bright star, Fomalhaut. On Monday, look for Jupiter less than seven degrees below the first-quarter moon. Saturn...

And spring 2011 is just around the corner

Sub-freezing temperatures and lots of winter wind guarantee that you won’t find me fishing Bay waters the rest of this month, at least not in my meager skiff. The dismal weather appears to have sealed my angling fate for the remainder of the season, but I have memories to keep me warm over the winter.   Fish Are Biting Big winter stripers are here, fresh from the ocean. Boats braving the wind and temperatures on the Bay and dragging big baits deep are landing fish over 40 inches...

Circus folk get squished between rogue cowboys and vengeful ninjas in this strange bit of camp.

Yang (Dong-gun Jang: The Promise) is the greatest swordsman of mankind and the deadliest assassin of the Sad Flutes, a Korean warrior clan. He has become his own clan’s worst enemy, though, after failing to take the life of a baby girl for the sake of wiping out a rival clan. Escaping retribution, Yang flees with the child to America and into western badlands. There he settles in among sad carnies in a dead town and teaches a plucky dame how to wield a blade. But just as he seems to have...

A little juice goes a long way for these Duffy Electric Boats

Where does the only Earth-friendly, $1-a-fill-up fuel in Annapolis come from? The nearest electrical outlet. As long as the power cord is long enough, Sally Koch, owner of SJ Koch Duffy Electric Boats, can run not only her boats but also as many electrical appliances as captain and crew can operate. Power like that comes in especially handy when the “living room on water” — Koch’s name for her quiet, comfortable fleet — glides through the 28th annual Eastport...

Not all Christmas trees are created equal

Not all evergreen trees are equally fire resistant. The Douglas fir is the most fire resistant tree, while the popular Fraser fir is the most combustible. Freshness has nothing to do with it. Douglas fir is a low-resin tree while Fraser fir is a high-resin tree. Assuring that your Christmas tree is a fire-safe tree begins with selecting the right tree. The State of Maryland fire marshal has declared that the most fire-resistant species are Douglas fir, Colorado spruce and Scots pine. This...
Dear Bay Weekly: Had to write with kudos on the Season’s Bounty: 41,000 words … Wow! I of course enjoyed Ellen Moyer’s trail article in the same issue, Go Outside and Play [http://bayweekly.com/articles/good-living/article/go-outside-and-play]. –Dave Linthicum, Jug Bay   Editor’s note: Linthicum is a trail enthusiast and mapper. You read about his recreational map of the Patuxent River in A Passion for the Patuxent in Bay Weekly’s June 24 issue: http://...
Dear Bay Weekly: I pick up Bay Weekly every week, usually at Gary’s Grill, and I love the sudoku puzzle. I try the crossword, too, but I’m better at the sudoku. You haven’t run the answers to the sudoku the past couple weeks. And why don’t you have the answers to the puzzles in that week’s paper instead of the next week? A week is a long time to wait. –Pauline Koch, Severna Park   Editor’s reply: Many papers run the answers to their puzzles in the...
Dear Bay Weekly: Right on, Steve Carr [Nov. 24]! I love those little urban and suburban patches of nature. They remind us that nature lives on and is incredibly resilient. When I go back to Pittsburgh, I am amazed by all the wildlife that has made comebacks from the industrial wastelands. There are now pileated woodpeckers in the woods around my mom’s house. I never saw them anywhere around there when I was growing up. There are hawks everywhere, even on the light posts along the parkways...