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Local civic groups help make the world a better place

Add lifesaving gear to your holiday giving

Tundra swans return to Chesapeake Country

Good for laughs but not much else

After six days pheasant hunting, we were exhausted, wind-burned — and ecstatic

You say you want a revolution. Well you know, we all want to change the world.

And in Anne Arundel County, prize-winning snowmen

“Who doesn’t love making snowmen?” Carolyn Ryan, organizer of the first annual Snowman Building Contest, speaks for her fellow snow lovers at the Anne Arundel County Department of Recreation and Parks, sponsors of the first of what they hope will be an annual contest.  The contest, which is open-ended from the time of the first measurable snowfall to its last blanketing, will be judged in three categories: Traditional; Most original/creative; and Just for kids (14 and...

Some of the sky’s brightest sites travel this road through the heavens

The waning gibbous moon rises around 7:45pm Friday, January 21. Look a half-dozen degrees above it for the blue-white star Regulus, the heart of Leo the lion. Just as the lion is the king of beasts, Leo is the king of the constellations. In Latin, regulus means little king. The star is located right on the ecliptic, the apparent path of the sun, moon, planets and the constellations of the zodiac, meaning that at times during each year it rises with the sun, giving it great powers throughout...

He’s Got His Mother’s Nose

He doesn’t have a name yet, but the National Zoo’s baby giant anteater already has a photo blog and a ghostwriter. Keeper Marie Magnuson has been posting status updates and photos of the long-nosed baby boy since his birth in December. Magnuson had close contact with the baby in the early days, because mother Maripi wasn’t producing enough milk to keep the little guy gaining weight. How do you surrogate nurse an anteater? It’s pretty complicated considering the creature...

For more than 25 years, Bowen’s plastic bovine has been great advertising.

Is it a cow? A bull? A steer?Whatever, the life-size brown and white bovine perched atop Bowen’s Grocery in Huntingtown is a community fixture. And a handy navigational aide: Turn right at the store with the cow on the roof. Long-time locals, accustomed to the roof adornment, barely give it a passing glance. But newcomers and passers-by want to know What’s with the cow? So Bay Weekly asked owner Gordon Bowen to explain. “We were visiting my daughter while she was at college in...

My mouth is watering as I plan for an early spring run1

This part of the year, trapped indoors by bad weather, always gets me to musing on better times — like last spring, when there was no better time in memory for getting the blues. I’m talking about Chesapeake Bay blue crabs of course, not the mournful variety.  I had steeled myself in 2010 not to expect anything happening crabwise until maybe mid-June, and perhaps not much even then. So I was astounded when a friend keyed me in to a red-hot run starting in mid-May....

Calvert Cliffs’ Miocene marine deposits are the largest in the world. But why?

I am going to test your patience and write about geology. This means you will be tempted to immediately turn to the News of the Weird. Please don’t. Memorize the following sentence; it is your five-second speech on what makes Calvert County special: Calvert Cliffs contain the largest exposed Miocene marine deposits in the world. That, and a geological mystery. The Miocene marine deposits that form the famous, fossil-laden, Calvert Cliffs are roughly 10 million years old. That’s...

Come for a love story, stay for an emotional evisceration

Blue Valentine isn’t a romantic drama; it’s a horror movie for romantics. Derek Cianfrance’s (Cagefighter) film asks questions that most modern romantic movies attempt to avoid: What happens to a married couple when they fall out of love? What if you’re not meant to be with the person you married? The answers to these questions are often painful, messy and uncomfortable. So is Blue Valentine. But it stirs up all of these emotions without once turning into a melodrama....

Use the ash from your fires to help your garden grow

Wood ash is a great source of calcium and potassium, also providing some phosphorus and lots of essential trace elements. A 12-quart pail full of fine wood ash can be spread over at least 100 square feet of garden soil. Make certain that the ash is cool before spreading, especially if the soil is covered with dry leaves. Wood ash should never be stored in cardboard, paper or plastic containers. Always place wood ash in a metal container and store under cover. Most of the calcium in wood ash is...

Bay Weekly loves a success story — no matter how small — especially if it’s yours

How are your resolutions coming? Are you on the road to being healthier, wealthier and wiser in 2011? We’re talking about sustainability in the human sense here. Our own sustainability. It’s not only the Bay we need to sustain in health and productivity. Small as each of us humans is, we count too in the big picture of Earth’s sensitively calibrated and mysteriously linked ecosystems. So we’re included in Bay Weekly’s theme of sustainable living. Good thing, since...
Dear Bay Weekly: I enjoyed reading Diana Beechener’s article, What’s With It: Finding the Source of a Local River, in the recent Bay Weekly of January 13. As a county resident who lives close to the Magothy, I never knew the meaning of the word until now. Also, in my role as editor of the Lake Waterford Community Association newsletter, I would like permission to reprint the article in our next edition. We have run several articles about the history of the Pasadena area over the...