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Ten ways to help our planet and your purse

Help give their migration a future

21 years into the culture of sustainable, new Bay times

It’s a shame to let April end with no pickerel

Here’s the right way to till the garden

Bright planets and shooting stars dazzle this week

The statues of Easter Island have front-row seats for solar eclipse

  Early risers Friday might catch the last of the waning crescent moon low in the east in the 90 minutes before daybreak at 5:48. Ten degrees to its left, glows Aldebaran, the bright red heart of Taurus the bull.  Later that same day, as darkness settles in after 8:30, Venus appears above the west horizon. The bluish light of Regulus shines about one degree to the lower left of Venus, but there is no comparison, as the so-called evening star shines more than 150 times brighter than...

Week 17: Coming Along Fine

  Olivia is rearranging the furniture again. She’s been tugging and pushing and bringing in new twigs and slowly widening and, at the same time, lowering the edges of the nest in preparation for Junior’s growth and ultimate venture into flying. In the end, the nest will be as flat and broad as she can make it. The feeding goes on, and Junior keeps growing. It takes about eight weeks from hatching to flight, so we have a ways to go before Junior takes to the air. Sometime in mid...

-We welcome your opinions and letters – with name and address. We will edit when necessary. Include your name, address and phone number for verification. Mail them to Bay Weekly, 1629 Forest Drive, Annapolis, MD 21403 •E-mail them to editor@bayweekly.com. or submit your letters on-line by clicking here.

  -What’s Up with the Fish Nets? Dear Bay Weekly: On July 4, we were enjoying the Bay and went by fish nets. We were shocked there were so many dead rockfish that we got the camera and took a picture. Is this because they did not work the nets due to the holiday? Or is this just normal net business? –Curious boaters, Linda & Matt: outat45@cox.net Editor’s reply: We’ve never seen dead fish in a fish net. Perhaps readers can supply an answer? - Feeling the...

Chesapeake Field Guides travel with you by iPad or iPhone

  Chesapeake Bay? There’s an app for that. Last week, the Chesapeake Bay Trust released an iOS application called Chesapeake Field Guide. If you’ve ever been out of doors and wondered what that bird call is or if that plant is dangerous, answers are now only a tap away. “It’s a fantastic tool for people to learn about the Bay, with thousands of images at the palm of your hand,” says Alex Hance, executive director at the Chesapeake Bay Trust. “The core...

With oyster supplies stifled by the Gulf oil spill, demand for shell grows

  The oil itself may not soil the Bay, but the effects of the massive spill are being felt along its shores by the people who depend on the Gulf fisheries for a living. Jobs are being lost as Virginia and Maryland oyster shucking houses have already begun to see their oyster supply dry up as Gulf fisheries close, one by one. Louisiana supplies Maryland shucking houses with between 60 and 70 percent of their oysters. In turn, those shucking houses provide shells for Maryland’s seed...

Helping his Duke team win the NCAA basketball championship has earned Nolan Smith, of Upper Marlboro, no summer vacation

  A Bay Weekly exclusive   Only 3.6 seconds remained in the last college basketball game of the season, on April 5, when Butler’s Gordon Hayward grabbed a rebound and sped upcourt. The six-foot-eight Hayward, soon to be a wealthy pro, launched a prayer from 50 feet. Its trajectory held rapt the attention of some 49 million people watching on television — not to mention the thousands in Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana. Would the ball go in to provide a real-life...

Helping his Duke team win the NCAA basketball championship has earned Nolan Smith, of Upper Marlboro, no summer vacation

  A Bay Weekly exclusive   Only 3.6 seconds remained in the last college basketball game of the season, on April 5, when Butler’s Gordon Hayward grabbed a rebound and sped upcourt. The six-foot-eight Hayward, soon to be a wealthy pro, launched a prayer from 50 feet. Its trajectory held rapt the attention of some 49 million people watching on television — not to mention the thousands in Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana. Would the ball go in to provide a real-life...

How to prune your bare-bottomed hedges

  A neat, completely green sheared hedge of privet can be very attractive in a landscape. But most often the bottom branches lose their leaves, and the hedge quickly loses its attractiveness. This is a common problem and one that can easily be corrected, as I showed in a recent pruning workshop that required rejuvenating an old privet hedge with nothing but naked branches on the lower half.  Plants lose their bottom leaves because those leaves are being shaded out by branches and...

On vacation, your mind wanders

  The Sailing Emporium, Rock Hall, Maryland—Don’t you love how things fly into you out of the blue? Only the good things, of course. Last week’s letter, Who Says You’re Reading Less?, tickled the memory of an old university friend, who in turn set me remembering another life. “Loved your essay on books and reading choices,” wrote John Knoll. “Walter Ong is smiling.” This week’s letter should keep Father Ong smiling down from the heaven...

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s a person in a chicken suit

  Chesapeake Bay is full of crap — literally. An EPA study found that 17 percent of nitrogen pollution and 26 percent of pollution in the Bay comes from animal manure. Environment Maryland wants you to hold the biggest polluters responsible — even if motivating you takes dressing up like a chicken to do it. To educate you about the damage your chicken dinner can cause, the people at Environment Maryland meet you at the point of contact: grocery stores. “We wanted to make...