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You won’t want to go through this looking glass

Jan Miles was bred to captain Maryland’s ­historic clipper ship

We have food pantries all over the state. Why not furniture pantries?

Three years in, I’m planning ahead for optimal success

See them again this year on the Osprey Cam

Fowler’s Followers wade in for the Patuxent

  Bernie Fowler’s Sneaker Index did not soar this year. He saw 341x2 inches of leg, for a water clarity index equal to that of 2004, but far below the goal of 57 inches last seen in 1960. The former state senator and Patuxent River champion needed many to the ninth power to describe the years it will take before the river is as clear, hence unpolluted, as in his youth.  “Bernie Fowler is never going to live long enough to see the river cleaned up,” he said, comparing...

Keep your eyes peeled for more Maryland plates this summer

  Just in time for the long, irritable driving hours to your summer vacation, license plate bingo gets more interesting. School’s end brought a new standard license plate to Maryland. Maryland War of 1812 plates, issued on Flag Day, June 14, are still rare enough that they should be worth double points on highway bingo. But they won’t be rare for long, as the new commemorative plate is standard issue and will gradually replace Maryland’s old black-and-white plate with the...

Mapmaker Dave Linthicum has dedicated 17 years
to mapping Maryland’s River

Chesapeake Country’s Skyline Drive — with boats, not cars. That’s how Dave Linthicum sees the Patuxent River, which runs by his front door. Ask him why, and off his tongue rolls a list of Patuxent River glories. It’s lovely, for one, he says, with a quiet beauty that creeps up on you like fog. The Patuxent is historic. Humans have lived on its shores for 10,000 years, leaving their relics and place markers. Native Americans wrote their chapters of history on the land,...

It makes no nitrogen to spare

  A few weeks back (June 3), we talked about how to grow a clover lawn. There are advantages to clover, but feeding the grass isn’t one of them. It’s true that clover is a legume, and it fixes its own nitrogen from Earth’s atmosphere. But clover won’t fertilize the lawn where it’s growing.  The nitrogen that clover fixes is totally utilized by the clover plant and is not released into the soil unless the clover plant is killed. Only after the nitrogen has...

The Patuxent is hungry for your love

  Do you love a river? We’ve all got good reason to. Rivers wrote the American story. This land was penetrated, mapped and settled on the backs of rivers. You crossed an ocean so full of peril that the old maps told no lies in populating the big waters with sea monsters. You bumped ashore on some care-worn ship and began scratching out a living in the hard dirt. When you were ready to pick up and move farther inland, seeking something better, you rode a river. The ride wasn’t...

The Patuxent is hungry for your love

  Do you love a river? We’ve all got good reason to. Rivers wrote the American story. This land was penetrated, mapped and settled on the backs of rivers. You crossed an ocean so full of peril that the old maps told no lies in populating the big waters with sea monsters. You bumped ashore on some care-worn ship and began scratching out a living in the hard dirt. When you were ready to pick up and move farther inland, seeking something better, you rode a river. The ride wasn’t...

Brown pelicans arrive after wintering on the Gulf Coast

  The brown pelican, Pelicanus occidentalis, is the state bird of Louisiana. Worldwide, there are six species of pelican. Two species, the white and the brown, are native to the U.S. The brown is the smallest of all; Atlantic browns are even smaller than the ones in the Pacific. Still they are large and with their huge bill, unmistakable. For years, brown pelicans were not to be seen on the Chesapeake — or anywhere. From the late 1950s until the mid 1980s, the brown pelican...

Calvert Marine Museum’s snakehead settles into life in solitary confinement

  Two years ago, the Calvert Marine Museum put a new inmate in the tank, a snakehead fish, as the showpiece of the museum’s invasive species exhibit. “It was a good example because there was a lot of press on it a few years back,” says Ken Kaumeyer, the museum’s curator of estuarine biology. Though the fish hasn’t attempted a jailbreak, Kaumeyer isn’t ready to declare it a model prisoner. Originally, the snakehead was to be part of a larger exhibit,...

Week 16: Junior Thrives

  There is only one baby osprey this year, Olivia usually has three each year, but she has been having her trials of late. Last year, she lost all her babies when a windstorm toppled the nest into the water and the chicks drowned. This year, some sort of mishap occurred with her initial eggs. Junior is growing by leaps and bounds and is well attended by his parents. I see his little tousled head poking up above the nest every day now as his mother feeds him fresh-caught fish. When he...

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  Another Member of the Osprey Fan Club Dear Bay Weekly: I wanted to let you know how much I enjoy reading the weekly Osprey Saga by Michael Koblos. These are amazing birds. –Peg Richardson, Lusby   Loving Rivers Dear Bay Weekly: Thank you for the excellent June 24 editorial, “Love a River,” reminding us of the role of our rivers and our history, followed by the feature about mapmaker Dave Linthicum’s passion for the Patuxent. What better time than summer to...