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Little Coconut, Pineapple and Twix taught these middle-schoolers a big lesson

Mary Davis earns two trophies, a crown and a summer reprieve from a bodybuilder’s diet

Citizen scientists join the search for other life forms

League of Conservation Voters wants your photos

With the title comes accountability

But when half of all crabs are ­harvested each year, we’ve got to work to keep the population steady

Don’t over-handle your onions

Onions are bulbing. Disturbing the plants now will reduce the storage life of the bulbs. Keeping your onion patch free of weeds is important, but from now until harvest you’ll want to weed by hand. An onion hoe may damage bulbs.     The keeping quality of onions depends on strong and healthy plants. So you should irrigate your onions in drought. Since onions are generally shallow rooted, they should receive a minimum of one inch of water each week. I irrigate my onions...

Fear is the monster in this clever ­psychological horror film

Disease is sweeping the country. How it started or can be prevented, these are mysteries. The only thing anyone knows for sure is that once you catch it, you’re dead.     Paul (Joel Edgerton: Loving) is the patriarch of a family trying to survive this modern plague. He sequesters his wife Sarah (Carmen Ejogo: Alien: Covenant) and son in a cabin in the woods, banking on isolation to protect them from the disease that has nearly destroyed humanity. The family spends quiet...

Firefighters save Lassie look-alike Siri

Anne Arundel County Firefighter Brian Doyle and his team were out on the water training when they got the call. A dog trapped down a hole near Edgewater needed rescuing.     His Special Operations Confined Space Rescue Team jumped into action, splitting up so that some could get their special rescue rig from the Jones Station firehouse while the rest headed to the scene.     In what appeared to be a collapsed well, Siri was trapped. At eight feet, the hole was...

These young inventors can make a robot to solve it

Steve Jobs. Bill Gates. Dillon Mandley. Kevin Lin. Everyone knows the first two names. The last two — not yet. In 1980, Jobs and Gates were a couple of 20-somethings working in their garages on what they hoped would be the next big thing. These two icons started in the west; the next two can rise anywhere, maybe even Southern Maryland.     Innovation can take root wherever a problem needs to be solved. The emerging aquaculture business along Chesapeake Bay has a unique set...

The historic church at Brick Church Road

Four hundred years of history converge at Anne Arundel County’s tiny All Hallows Parish, at the intersection of Maryland Rt. 2 with Brick Church Road, in Edgewater. Perhaps you’ve noticed its State of Maryland roadside historical marker. Were you to stop and read, here’s what you’d find — and a bit more.     Back in 1692, the British Crown decreed the Anglican Church the official church of the colony of Maryland. The province was divided into 30...

Water Trail map directs you to the treasures of the Magothy

Paddling in the digital age comes with a new set of advantages. Now, when setting out for an adventure on the Magothy River, paddlers can use an online trail map of 30 points of interest plus nine “hidden gems.”     The digital water trail map links you to 17 videos of the river’s creeks and coves and suggests what to see and how to navigate through those waterways. Many coves are hard to find unless you know where to enter.     A chart on the...

New parents take books home with babies

First-time parents in Anne Arundel County now have another bundle to carry home from the hospital: Baby Learns to Read Bags.     The bags include board books, a library card application and activity cards for early literacy as well as guidance for parents on being their child’s first teachers.     The bags go home with parents of children born at both the Anne Arundel Medical Center and the University of Maryland Baltimore Washington Medical Center....

In Bay Weekly’s annual Summer Guide, you’ll find 101 Ways to fill yours with fun

It’s getting to feel a lot like summer.          Days are long as the sun sidles north. At 14 hours and about 52 minutes of daylight, we’re rushing toward the longest days of this year, June 20 and 21, when the sun is with us 14 hours 56 minutes 18 seconds. With all that sun time, skies are blue and clouds shape-changing puffballs — except when thunderstorms clatter through and drench our plans. The vegetable kingdom is in riot, encompassing...

Where else can you be when ­nothing goes wrong?

There is nothing like an early June morning on the Chesapeake.     A bit of smoky haze was still rising off of the Eastern Shore in the far distance as we cleared the ramp and eased out of the channel onto  glassy Bay surface.     The quiet burble of our outboard was the only sound, and for a long while neither of us cared to hear anything else. At last, looking around at the rocky piers we were approaching, I took an already rigged light spin outfit and...

Even with compost you can overdo it

Recently a Bay Weekly reader complained she could not grow cauliflower or broccoli. The plants grew big and lush but never produced edible heads — all this despite the large amount of compost she added to her garden soil each year.     My response was too much of a good thing. Compost is a good source of not only long-lasting fiber but also slow-release nutrients. For every percent of organic matter in soil, an acre of soil generates 10 pounds of nitrogen each year. If...