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How some of the world’s most famous art found safe refuge in early-America’s Annapolis

That’s Charles Baker, streetside entertainer

Chesapeake Curiosities: Battle Creek Cypress Swamp is the northernmost of its kind

Summer sends these insects singing

There may be a fungus in your soil

Plan B might be your score

What could have been an interesting political satire or a subversive black comedy is instead a dreadfully dull horror movie laden with stereotypes

In 2022, the American government has come up with a solution for crime: The Purge. Once every year, for 12 hours, all crime is legal. You can murder, rape, assault and rob to your heart’s content and get a free pass. Government officials are protected, emergency services are shut down and the rest of the country lets it rip.     Wealthy Americans are usually safe from The Purge. They hide behind fancy security systems, sometimes throwing Purge Parties, and watch the mayhem...

Take to the Road with Mr. Pish

Move over Lassie, Rin Tin Tin and Benji. Make way for Mr. Pish, the latest rising star in the doggy world.     The feisty 14-year old Jack Russell terrier is a native of Maryland’s Eastern Shore. Like most pups, Mr. Pish enjoys swimming, running on the beach, eating, sleeping and petting. But most of all he loves to explore and share his discoveries with his friends. This canine King of the Road is the author of a series of travel books for children, promoting respect for...

Libraries make summer reading fun

School’s out! Children yell and jump for joy, getting pumped for a fun summer of beaches, lazy days and reading. Anne Arundel and Calvert Libraries are helping kids Dig into Summer Reading, a national initiative to make books part of summer’s fun.     Anne Arundel and Calvert libraries are spicing summer reading with jugglers, mad scientists, magicians and puppets.     “This is an opportunity for kids to have fun with reading,” says...

This frothy farce reflects on commitment as characters at crossroads take literal and figurative steps

British farces are not usually my cup of tea; I find madcap, bawdy romps to be silly and exhausting. But Alan Ayckbourn’s Taking Steps is a delightful summer infusion of iced chai: more cool and spicy than hot and saucy, with suspenseful plot twists to make it fun. Colonial Players’ production delivers on its promise to present “a set of very probable, though quite amusing characters in a series of improbable situations that uncover a treasure trove of truth about human nature...

There’s no better way to know the Chesapeake

Bay beaches are tucked away in coves throughout Chesapeake Country. With tides and waves, soft sand, salty air and cooling breezes, they’re a nature lover’s paradise.     Our beaches are sown by the Bay with fascinating finds: shells, stones, driftwood, sea-glass frosted and smoothed by years of ocean tossing and tumbling. If your beach is within the range of Calvert Cliffs, Miocene fossils make for exciting and rare treasure finds.     When you...

NFL players no match in charity softball game

A friendly charity match turned into a beating around the bottom of the fourth inning. The June 1 NFL vs. Wounded Warrior Amputee Softball Team game drew crowds from nearby military bases and football fans from far and wide.     With Ravens’ starter Torrey Smith pitching, the Wounded Warriors took an early lead and remained dominant throughout the game. NFL players Smith, DeSean Jackson and E.J. Biggers proved handy with a bat, helping their team earn five runs. The fatal...

With a wingspan up to four inches, Luna moths are one of the largest in North America

Like springtime, Luna moths represent rebirth and renewal.     I usually see one or two early each spring, hanging around hubby’s bug zapper. Perhaps they’re drawn to the light’s blue glow. The zapper poses no threat to the Luna moths, which are too large to fit through the miniature cage.     I thought they were eating the insects collected inside the zapper. I was wrong. Luna moths have no mouth, a trait they share with silkworm moths. They...

Not too early for garlic

Gail Martinez of Fairhaven Cliffs reports with excitement harvesting the season’s first heads of garlic. Planted in fall and well composted, garlic puts its roots down before winter so it’s got a head start on the new year’s growing season.     The Bay Gardener suggests Martinez must have been out to harvest so soon. Prime harvest time for garlic nor onions is about usually in July, when the foliage dries out. Until then, the bulbs are swelling, he says. Upon...

Expose yourself to the natural elements during Great Outdoors Month

What’s your sign?         Summer’s water sign, Cancer, is mine. I share it with Free Will Astrology writer Rob Breszny, who has been inspiring you these 20 years with his insights into how our birth links us in the great chain of being. I wish I’d counted the number of readers who’ve told me over the years they got into Bay Weekly because of Breszny. Even better are stories of how he’s guided readers’ lives.     ...

You get twice the angling fun, catching two fish to keep one

The tiniest peck on my bait set me instantly alert. With my index finger curled under the reel seat and just touching my rod blank, I tensed to feel another bite. There was no mistaking the rascal’s next move. Abruptly my rod tip jerked down, and I set the hook.     My light casting rod oscillated with the fish’s tight, frantic circles as it fought to the surface. Then I softly derricked the fish up and into my open palm. It was a Norfolk spot, or a yellowbelly as...