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A 4,000-mile cycling trek for cancer awareness led this young couple to the altar

2nd Star Productions updates this classic with color-blind casting

Aquarium names baby loggerhead

Find it in our new Coloring Corner

Small gardens can yield big rewards

It’s the critical link to your fish

Librarians are our literary guides, anticipating our tastes and putting books to meet them in our hands, audio players and eReaders on demand. When you need a book, you ask a librarian. Here, in a special to Bay Weekly, Anne Arundel County Public Librarians review novels by local authors.

Deadrise by Robert Blake Whitehill     Deadrise, the first book in the Ben Blackshaw series, will capture your attention and have you on the edge of your seat from page one when the title character finds a wealth of gold, a dirty bomb and the corpse of his father while diving for oysters in the Chesapeake Bay.     There’s something for most readers in this book: a suspenseful mystery, fast-paced action, compelling characters and vivid descriptions of the...

This week, the lion is winning

I’m stuck here in the middle with you. In this season of uncertainty, the good company is welcome.     Supposedly Gerry Rafferty and Joe Egan were stuck in the middle of record negotiations when they wrote those lyrics, recorded by their band Stealers Wheel in 1972.     They could have been writing about March, the month that bears the double character of lion and lamb.     As I write, the lion is roaring.     The white lamb-...

Read this before you start cutting

What should I prune when? is one of the most common questions I am asked.     I answer that we prune for quality — with exceptions.     In general, prune summer- and fall-flowering plants in the early spring so the plant can produce an abundance of new branches on which flowers will develop and bloom. Buddleia or butterfly bush, roses, hydrangea, crape myrtle and elaeagnus fall into this category. Early spring pruning gives these plants encouragement to...

Changing conditions bring new characters to Chesapeake waters

Perhaps it’s global warming. Maybe it was a super-successful spawn. Or it could be another one of those things that can’t be explained. Whatever the cause, young redfish are pushing up the Bay in search of new sources of food.     This high up in the Bay is the northern edge of these fish’s customary salinity range. But anecdotal indications are that a pretty fair number of redfish overwintered here. That means you’re likely to encounter these game fish...

Scan the west after sunset

After last month’s near-passing asteroid and the exploding meteorite over Siberia, we have another interloper passing through: Comet Pan-STARRS. Given clear skies and an unobstructed view of the west horizon at dusk, you can spot this comet over the coming week.     Sunday, March 10 marks its closest approach to the sun and thus its brightest appearance. But the comet doesn’t reach its highest point in our skies until March 20, when you may be able to spot it as late...

Overcoming the sins of the father — and the fatherland

What if the people who loved you turned out to be monsters? Could you change your worldview to survive in this new order? Or would the truth end up swallowing you whole?     Fourteen-year-old Lore (Saskia Rosendahl: Für Elise) lives an idyllic life in World War II Germany. Blonde and blue-eyed, she’s the picture of youthful innocence, still more child than woman as she romps through fields in suspendered skirts and Heidi braids.     A high-ranking SS...

In vernal pools, renewal is under way

This time of year, marbled salamander tadpoles are already swimming through the shallow waters of vernal pools. Vernal pools are temporary wetland habitats in our forests. They hold water long enough during spring to attract special animals that you aren’t likely to see anywhere else. Then the pools dry up, so fish and other large predators can’t live there.     What is that? visitors want to know of the oddities they see when exploring a vernal pool at Jug Bay...

Here’s to Magic Weisner, Laura Neuman and the power of possibility

The Odd Chance In 2002, a Maryland dark horse named Magic Weisner came within a half-length of stealing the Preakness Stakes from front runner War Emblem. Local small-scale trainer Nancy Alberts believed in Magic, who she named for the vet who saved the magically resilient foal’s life. That horse could run.     Cheering with the rest of Maryland, I followed the story to Laurel Racetrack, where I interviewed Alberts and Magic.     Odd chance has been again...

And earn you a buck a bushel

Oyster shells could be worth more than the change in your pocket if the Oyster Recovery Partnership can talk the political talk.     The nonprofit Partnership, which has planted four billion seed oysters in its work for recovery, is now seeking to persuade legislators to pass a bill giving a $1 tax credit for every bushel of oyster shells you recycle.     Shells are desperately needed to make habitats for new oyster families and the communities they support....

Red Wigglers demonstrate the inside story of composting

Red Wiggler worms are busy digging and dining in a compost Can-O-Worms at Annmarie Garden.     Second graders visiting Annmarie Garden on daily CHESPAX field trips explore the world of composting with a little help from the Garden’s squirmy residents, about a thousand in all.     Red Wiggler worms, along with eight volunteers who do the talking, teach the students hands-on and practical ways to go green in their daily lives.     “The...