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Look for Chessie Ruckus and his partner Officer First Class Jake Coxon in Annapolis

A barking good time for all at Quiet Waters Park

Becoming a Riverkeeper was my way of helping change ­people’s lives

After three years in Chesapeake waters, Pride of Baltimore II resumes her voyages of goodwill

Byway meadows help pollinators thrive

It’s just a game for Senior Olympic billiards player Blaine Jacobs

Look for Chessie Ruckus and his partner Officer First Class Jake Coxon in Annapolis

At first glance, the scene at Sandy Point State Park on a bright June morning had all the earmarks of a typical graduation ceremony. Camera-toting family and friends eagerly faced a lectern where officials gathered, diplomas at the ready. But instead of strains of Pomp and Circumstance, barks and yips were the music of the day.     Natural Resources Police was holding its first in-state graduation ceremony honoring three new K-9 handlers and their canine colleagues, who will be...

A barking good time for all at Quiet Waters Park

On a perfect June day, more than 2,200 humans and their canine companions showed their support for the Anne Arundel County SPCA at the 25th annual Walk for the Animals, rescheduled from its original torrentially rainy May date.     Humans and canines of all shapes and sizes teamed up at the record-breaking event June 19 at Quiet Waters Park for a 5K run and walk. The fur was flying all morning as dogs — both large and small, fluffy and fuzzy — strutted their stuff...

Becoming a Riverkeeper was my way of helping change ­people’s lives

February 1, 2003, was the day I first learned about Riverkeepers. I remember it so clearly because it was the same date the Space Shuttle Columbia burned up in the earth’s atmosphere over Texas.     That was a sad day for the space program, but my life took a fortuitous turn. I was a mid-life law student taking a Ferris Bueller-type day away from my studies to attend a Tributary Strategies Team meeting at the Maryland Department of Natural Resources in Annapolis. A guy...

After three years in Chesapeake waters, Pride of Baltimore II resumes her voyages of goodwill

How long can you stay at home before the urge to get out of the house overwhelms you? That restless feeling also afflicts one of our local treasures: the sailing ship Pride of Baltimore II. This year she is finally escaping her home waters of the Chesapeake Bay, off on the high seas to do what she was built to do: travel afar to represent Maryland and foster friendships and economic relations.     Since 1988, Pride II has been all over the world as Maryland’s ambassador....

Byway meadows help pollinators thrive

It’s a sunny summer’s day, and you’re taking a leisurely drive on a scenic Bay Country byway. Dotting the roadside are native Maryland meadows, alive with the waving of tall grasses and a jolly mashup of brightly hued wildflowers. There are the lavender-blue daisy-like aster, the bright yellow plumes of the goldenrod and the starry pink crowns of milkweed.     Such a sight could become more common along Maryland highways, thanks to the combined efforts of the...

It’s just a game for Senior Olympic billiards player Blaine Jacobs

What Olympic athlete would say the game is not about winning?     For one, Blaine Jacobs, Maryland’s Senior Olympic Gold Medalist in the sport of billiards.     In a small room with three pool tables in a row, five or six friends take turns setting the ball rolling. There’s little sign of old age at the O’Malley Senior Center in Odenton, with all the laughing and hard-focused seniors working on their next shot. In the corner of the room, wearing...

After rescue and recuperation, turtles released on World Sea ­Turtle Day

After seven months of swimming circles doing rehab in the pools at the National Aquarium, two juvenile green sea turtles have returned to the open wilds of the ocean, stronger and healthier.     The duo swam into the waters off Assateague Island National Seashore on June 16. The date marked World Sea Turtle Day and coincided with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Sea Turtle Week as well as the National Park Service’s centennial and the Aquarium...

An impressive troupe of young people takes on one of the most challenging races in theater

Producing a Shakespeare play is similar to running a marathon. It’s grueling, frustrating, thrilling and exhausting — and that’s just training.  Maintaining forward motion through the entire course is an accomplishment for any age.     Twin Beach Players youth production of Much Ado About Nothing has taken on that challenge with great success.      Framed at the end of World War II, Twin Beach Players’ Much Ado is a largely...

And thanks for keeping the dialogue going

Who wants to talk — or write — when nobody’s listening? Not me, regardless of what my husband might say. (He accuses me of happily talking to a void. Sometimes, that void is he.)     So I’m thrilled when you make Bay Weekly a dialogue. On that score, this has been a very good week.     In this space last week, I asked for stories of mid-20th century fathers. Reader Bonnie promptly sent hers, noting that traits pass down for better or worse...

Chesapeake Curiosities

At the corner of routes 468 and 255 in Galesville, a lovely, tree-filled cemetery reminds us that one of the first Quaker communities was in Chesapeake Country. George Fox, the father of the Religious Society of Friends — the proper name for the Quakers — opened the meeting house in Galesville in 1672, uniting various Quaker groups in Maryland into the first organized West River Yearly Meeting of Friends.     Fox advocated nonviolence, equality, obedience to God,...