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Performing Arts

Be sure to see this lovely ­production of an American classic

Love is a flower that grows in any soil, works its sweet miracles undaunted by autumn frost or winter snow, blooming fair and fragrant all the year, and blessing those who give and those who receive.             —Louisa May Alcott  

Practically Perfect in every way

It’s always dangerous to take on a classic; the chances of disappointment are so great. Who could ever compete with Dick Van Dyke and Julie Andrews as Bert the Chimney Sweep and Mary Poppins? Popular brother-and-sister team Nathan Bowen and Emily Mudd, that’s who.

Rocking with televangelical energy

Surely you remember Whoopi Goldberg in the hit film Sister Act? How outsized she was as nightclub chanteuse Deloris Van Cartier, how woefully entangled with her married mobster boyfriend, how terrified when she saw him shoot a man in cold blood and how hilarious she was masquerading as a nun? Hold that thought …

A refreshing cocktail of comedy

Summertime is the right time for a refreshing cocktail of comedy, and Colonial Players serves up a hilarious gimlet with the 2013 Tony Award winner for Best Play, Vanya and Sonya and Masha and Spike. Christopher Durang’s semi-absurdist script mixes a jigger of Chekhov with a Brothers Grimm simple syrup, adds a dash of Jerry Springer and tops it with a voodoo garnish.

Still playing after all these years? That’s relevance

   There are many reasons that theater classics are classics. In most cases, the reason can be described with one word: relevance. No matter how long ago a work of art was created, its relevance to the human condition makes it timeless. Such is the case with George Bernard Shaw’s Pygmalion, in a funny yet sobering revival at Compass Rose Theater.

A moviemaker without a script meets all the loves of his life in this seductive musical

Nine, like Colonial Players’ last show, is destined to sell out.

Pulitzer Prize-winning comedy yields a full house of fun

It takes chutzpah to put on a Pulitzer Prize-winning play, but Twin Beach Players thrives on challenge.

Timeless ideals well told and beautifully sung

“Camelot, located nowhere in particular, can be anywhere,” wrote a scholar on Arthurian times. Fortunately for us it resides until January 22 in Annapolis at Compass Rose Theater.     Director Lucinda Merry-Browne’s rousing revival takes a scaled-down approach to this Broadway blockbuster, proving that less is more. A cast of 10, a seven-foot grand piano grandly played and a spare set bring this passionate and humorous classic to life.

Our best family night at the theater — ever

Anight at the theater — or anywhere, for that matter — is always an adventure when you have children in tow. A few weeks ago, our family of four attended a musical production in Baltimore that left me wondering if I had made a big mistake thinking my sons would enjoy the theater.     Dad slept through the whole thing, the younger said there was too much singing, and the elder commented all the way through, despite my insistent hushing.

Like a horrific accident, it makes you cringe even as you brake to see it better

When outrage-stage author Edward Albee passed away in September, the theater world mourned with a collective gasp, as if his death from old age were just another violent trick designed to snap us out of complacency. The triple Pulitzer prize-winner aimed to make audiences so uncomfortable they would “run out of the theater — but come back to see the play again.” He succeeded most notably with his first full-length production, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf. The Pulitzer committee chose to grant no prize in 1963 rather than award it to Albee.