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Letter from the Editor

The best show in town reminds us that Chesapeake Country’s marine trades are alive and well

Faceting makes a stone into a gem. Brilliance shines from the cut faces and their interactions.     That may be true of places, too.     Chesapeake Country is a well-faceted place. The central facet is natural beauty, but the sidelights cut by human imagination and endeavor make this place shine still brighter. With seasonal and calendar changes, new facets catch the light. Week by week, Chesapeake Country turns new facets to fascinate us.

Open the door and pull it in

Do you belong to the opportunity society or the entitlement society?     Those are the rhetorical poles of this year’s presidential election, and like magnets, they supposedly push us apart.     Put those buzz words in a different order, and we could discover a society entitled to opportunity.     That’s a slogan we could all work with. Maybe we already do.     Isn’t universal education an entitlement to opportunity?

We write Bay Weekly for many tastes — especially yours

Bloody Murder is a play that “will slay you,” according to Bay Weekly theater reviewer Jane Elkin.     Do you care? Is 2nd Star Productions on your radar?     Jane’s opinion matters a lot to 2nd Star and the dozen community and professional theater companies whose plays are routinely reviewed in our pages. Davina Grace Hill, Bay Weekly’s other regular theater reviewer, and Jane damn or sanctify months of effort with their opinions.

Step one is putting the pieces together

The Labor Day weekend rain mostly skipped Chesapeake Country — at least my part — but tumultuous skies and soggy forecasts dampened a lot of parades. In Annapolis, First Sunday Arts Festival cancelled this month, and the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra moved its Labor Day Pops concert inside Maryland Hall, quashing plans for musical picnics in Quiet Waters Park.

Without transportation jobs, planning and spending, what will we do when we can’t get there from here?

Bay Weekly reporter Ashley Brotherton missed the news this week.     Instead of getting to know crabs in Cambridge, she spent two hours and $4 to go over the Bay Bridge twice.     So she also made the news. She and the thousand of other drivers whose routine 4.3-mile trip across Chesapeake Bay turned into — depending on their disposition and opportunity — hours of frustration, windfall time to play with their cell phones or impromptu, make-the-best-of-it block parties.

With all fall offers, parting is such sweet sorrow

Anticipation eases the sadness of summer’s leaving.     Officially, summer is with us until the autumnal equinox September 22. But the light is already changing, and so are the temperatures. There’s less sweat, more breeze. Lovely weather, isn’t it? we say to one another.

Dog Day reflections on feline companionship

This affectionate kitty loves people and rewards you with purrs when you pet him.     So says The Capital.     That’s a healthy note of skepticism you read in my words. Or perhaps it’s jealousy. For assertions like this one crank up a notch or 10 the friendly competition one newspaper editor feels on reading the pages of another paper.

That’s what the Olympics teach us about life and journalism

I’d blame it on Olympic fever, had not the urge to stretch our comfort zones begun before the Games of the XXX Olympiad opened on July 27.     Certainly, aspiration is fed by the spectacle of human beings attempting superhuman feats of strength, agility, grace, speed and endurance. By back-stories recounting achievement by sweaty, disciplined years-in-and-out perseverance. By slips and falls and rededication as much as by success.

Drink deeply of 2012. It’s a vintage year

Summer is half over. August 2 marks the midway point between the solstice, which began our summer on June 20, and the autumnal equinox, beginning fall on September 22.     That’s the woeful way of saying we have half the season of good times left. So let’s make the most of it.     Over the years Bay Weekly has made an art of gathering ways to enjoy summer. You’ll have misspent your summer if you haven’t made time for these.

Maryland chefs show you how to make the cool best of Buy Local

“Can you imagine eating a poor little tomato that had to drive all the way across California before it got here?” Gov. Martin O’Malley asked his guests at the fifth annual Buy Local Cookout on Government House lawn on a hot evening last week.