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Letter from the Editor

What’s new in Bay Weekly and beyond

If you were as lucky as I was, the days between Christmas and January 4 belonged to a different time zone. In that week, it’s possible to pretend everything’s done that needs to be done.     Not now! 2016 has come out of the gate like a horse on a fast track with a big purse at its end. It’s already run through its first week and speeding through its second. Things are moving.

Celebrate the season with Bay Weekly’s annual Christmas story

In this season dedicated to peace on earth and shared goodwill, Bay Weekly has a little gift to help you think well of one another.     Our gift is Bay Weekly’s annual Christmas story, in whose telling our writers have found the words to open our hearts to one another. Year after year, they’ve done it.     This year the words belong to Melissa Driscoll Krol whose story, A Christmas Miracle, takes us into the lives of a military family with premature twins and no money.

And you open up your world

Reading puts ideas in your head.          There are so many places I’ll never visit. So many times, both past and future, out of my reach. So many people so close and far whose lives are stories unto themselves. So many thoughts I’d never imagine.     Except for stories.     Stories are my magic carpet, my time traveling machine, my introduction, my education.

Take abundantly!

I used to dream of begin a doctor, though that dream faded as I fainted at the thought of blood. I’m better suited for prescribing help for the spirit. From my fully annotated Seasons Bounty, I offer my prescriptions for boosting your holiday spirit.

In every faith, we look ahead in hope

On American’s feast day, Thanksgiving, we look back at “the great and various favors” of our year. I hope you were inspired in your recollection and naming of your blessings this Thanksgiving Day by George Washington’s apt words, quoted in last week’s Letter.     Now we rush full of anticipation into the winter holidays.     These great holidays rise from separate faiths, but all share a common theme. Each turns us toward the future.

Thanksgiving is coming, with Christmas right behind

Perfect Thanksgiving weather, don’t you think?     Propelled by the gusty winds of autumn, fallen leaves dance the season. But not all have fallen, and trees glow with color, green and yellow yielding to scarlet, mahogany and umber, further gilded by long rays of the low sun. Cattails and reeds sway, and pine cones drop, all spreading their seed.     Above us, Vs of honking geese and ducks fly, pulling our eyes skyward to dramatic vistas of cloud and color.

They’re home to big thinkers, big ideas and new technologies

As an early reader of each issue of Bay Weekly, I’ve been thinking about Then & Now, staff writer Kathy Knotts’ story commemorating Annapolis Public Library’s half century on West Street.

Letters home from a new soldier, drafted to fight World War I

November 11 brings us once more to Veterans Day, our nation’s day of remembrance of all our veterans, living and dead. The 96-year-old commemoration began as Armistice Day, celebrating the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, when soldiers of the Allied Forces and of Germany, the enemy, laid down their weapons.

Is this “Reefer Madness”?

We’re looking forward to fields of marijuana amid the corn and soybeans in Southern Anne Arundel County.     That’s one implication of the semiannual survey Anne Arundel County opinion just released by The Center for the Study of Local Issues at Anne Arundel Community College.     Medical marijuana is riding a high, according to the survey, with 69 percent in favor of allowing its planting, processing and sale in Anne Arundel.

Prepare to be scared

What’s the scardest you’ve ever been?         Our bio-clocks tick in bodies built of ancient stuff, with primal alarms still set. Autumn’s fading light sets off those alarms big time. Three hours had drained from our days between the 15 hours of the Summer Solstice, June 21, and the 12 hours of the Autumnal Equinox on September 23. Soon after Halloween, the night of the spirits, our daylight hours have shrunk to 10, with worse to come. By the Winter Solstice, December 21, we have light for a mere nine hours.