view counter

Letter from the Editor

Expert advice at no charge — and expert help to restore your home and garden

If your home and garden look like mine, we both need help.     Winter 2013-’14 has kept us on the defensive, fending off its blows. There’ve been drafts to keep out, fires to keep burning, limbs to duck, snow to shovel, salt to spread, ice to scrape, birds to feed, falls to heal, floods to staunch, floors to mop … and that’s just my list. I bet you can add a lot more.     Keeping winter from knocking you down takes just about everything you’ve got. Progress is just keeping up.

Meet Helen Tawes and Dawn Lindsay

History months — whether February for Black History or March for Women’s History — strike me as being as much about the march into the future as the march from the past.     That’s my excuse for commemorating Women’s History Month in our pages as March 2014 marches into history.

If it’s right, the EPA needs to hear from us

This week we celebrate Maryland Day.         It’s a great thing to live in a state that knows its past and keeps it alive in legend, song, story and opportunity.     Our feature story, Time Out from the March of Time, guides you to dozens of ways to experience segments of Maryland’s 380-year history, right in the places where history lives on.     We’re also a state that puts great thought into our future. Smart Growth, renewable energy, restoring the Chesapeake are all on our agenda.

The saint’s day gives us the first green of the year — plus an Old Country lesson in sustainability

With spring one more tantalizing week away, we’re grasping at straws that bespeak the awaited season.     Meteorological winter is over and temperatures rising, sometimes imperceptibly, but inevitably until July, our hottest month, has us wishing for a trip to last winter’s icehouse. Peepers and their amphibian brethren are singing, as you know or will on reading this week’s Creature Feature. Crocuses are blooming, at least in some sunny yards. Daffodils are rising, their leaves now standing four to six inches above ground.

Read on; dreaming is ageless

For generations of kids, summer was what you wrote home about. For the week or two of camp — even the whole expansive summer for the lucky ones who lived on the water or traded inland homes for once fashionable boarding houses — you might as well have been in heaven, were it not for the sea nettles.     Those times have never ended.     This week, Bay Weekly shows you how, where and when the kids in your life can continue the tradition. With or without jellyfish.

Put in the right hole, our money — and effort — makes a difference.

As winter hangs on like a bad cold, my hibernating nature has sought no bigger decision than whether to devote the 9pm Sunday hour to Downton Abbey or True Detective.     Yet in the wider world, big stuff — actual transformative change — is going on. So I’ve poked my head out of the burrow to take a look.

1. You’d ride an icebreaker rather than stay ashore one day longer. (See Bob Melamud’s feature story, The Coolest Ride up the Bay.) 2. The visiting swans and snowy owls had boots and sweaters shipped in from the tundra. 3. Need a loan to pay your bird (and squirrel) food bill.   4. Holiday decorations have been up for so long a neighbor asks if you’re early this year.   5. The most common-colored car? Salt gray.

Every love story has to start somewhere

Love is a quest we all have in common.     But where to find it? Ah, that’s the question.     Every story in Bay Weekly’s now 21-year-old annual Valentine’s Day perusal of life and literature’s great theme has touched on that question.     Don’t look to this year’s pair of love stories to break the rule.     The quest is the adventure of “Winking at Mr. Darcy,” pseudonymous writer Liz Bennet’s chronicle of her one-month trial of Match.com.

Bay Weekly’s 17th annual Mid-Winter Movie Escape will see you through

A lot about February makes a person want to nestle with a good movie.

Snowstorm memories from long ago bring a real tingle

Sending out school buses to pick up kids at the usual early hour on the slick morning of Friday, January 10, has Anne Arundel and Calvert school administrators groveling and parents howling.     When I was a kid, we’d walk miles to school in the worst weather winter could throw at us.     Okay, I’m exaggerating a generation or two. The only time I walked miles in the worst weather winter could throw at us was to get away from school.