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Letter from the Editor

Farewell to one neighbor; bon voyage to another

For most of my earlier years, the neighborhoods where I lived were grids, and connections followed straight lines, side to side and front to back. Sometimes I was lucky and the next- or nearly next-door neighbors were people of shared interests beyond the chance of proximity. That’s how husband Bill and I developed dear friendships with the Kirkpatricks, next door but one, and the Ladleys, next door but two, in Holland Point, where we spent our first years in Chesapeake Country.

Autumn’s Won My Heart Away

Summer on the Chesapeake is not a perfect season, but I sure hate to see it go. Summer 2011 showed us its terrible temper in plenty of ways: weeks in the stew pot, torrential rains, gale-force winds or none at all, stink bugs on the peaches, mosquitoes on me. But such moods don’t overshadow my love for the thrill of a breeze, the exuberance of the leaves, the moment to seize.
Editor’s note: For all each of us remembers about the day we now mark as 9/11, we have forgotten one thing: The utter shock of surprise. Disbelief has dissipated like dusty explosive smoke. Ever since those four moments of impact, we have had knowledge instead of innocence. We are like Adam and Eve driven from the garden.     Ten years after, the words I wrote on the morning of September 12, 2001, are the closest I can come to before. I offer them to you to read and remember.

Do your first job well, and you’re likely to get a second

Colleen McCaig got her first job last week. Having delivered fliers door to door in her Fairhaven community, the 10-year-old waited by the phone.     “It will never work,” she wailed to her mother. “Nobody will call.”

Is this fall your time to soar?

Do you envy the kids, just a little bit, as they load up on school supplies, dress up in new clothes and walk to the corner to meet the school bus?     Maybe not the school bus part of the proposition. At least for me.

Your dog’s name may say more about you than about him or her

We love our dogs. Forty-six million of us share our homes with 78 million dogs. So when the constellation Sirius brings us the Dog Days of summer, Bay Weekly goes to the dogs to pander to that audience.

Locavores need loads of newsprint

On Sundays, my husband — a lifelong print newspaperman — can imagine himself happy in a world of paperless newspapers. That’s because I’ve never managed the skill of neatly refolding a read newspaper.

Rod ’n’ Reel’s Cancer Crusade and Annapolis Rotary’s Crab Feast are acts worth clapping for

Fishing for compliments was one of my mother’s seven deadly sins, and she passed along her aversion. So I cast a fishy eye at all the liking social media specialists urge on us. I’m not much more comfortable at events — from Major League Baseball to business booster meetings —where you’re told who to clap for, when and how loud.     In my book, as in my mother’s, applause wants to rise spontaneously.

With summer’s bounty upon us, we’re running to keep up

The many stories about food and feast featured in this week’s paper may lead you to think we’ve forgotten our timing and brought you our Thanksgiving feasting issue four months early.     We’re not confused; we’re just keeping up with the harvest, which reaches its peak this time of year.

Not nearly so safe that we can let our guard down

How are the walking and the biking where you live?     Annapolis is a town designed for walking, former two-term Annapolis mayor Ellen Moyer tells us in this week’s Capital City, her occasional Bay Weekly column. But, she convincingly argues, it’s got a way to go to be a Walk-Friendly Community.