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Letter from the Editor

Commemoration …   

Tuesday and Wednesday, the Blue Angels awe us with fearless acrobatics, then streak into the wild blue yonder, our imaginations trailing.     Friday, the midshipmen of the U.S. Naval Academy class of 2014 receive their commissions.     Monday completes the cycle.     All the warriors we honor on Memorial Day were once young as those midshipmen, younger even, entrusting themselves to a future beyond their imagining.

Time to hook our wagons to energy unlimited

Formidable is the fecundity of the vegetable kingdom.         Over just a couple of weeks, Chesapeake County has been conquered by green. So quickly that you have to be looking to notice the creeping change, as leaves, seeds and flowers shoot forth. Trunks, branches and limbs of apparently dead trees have burst into green life.

I hope you have her enshrined in sacred words and pictures

For this week’s Mother’s Day feature, 16 daughters and sons describe their mothers’ superwoman strength when standing by their sides. Without second thought, most chose one single moment preserved full, fresh and sacred out the procession of shared hours, days and years. What that moment would be no one but the writer — certainly not her or his mother — could imagine.

A higher price than we’ll like paying

Are we doing enough?         Reader Frank Allen’s answer to my Earth Day Is Our Birthday question, which you’ll read below in Your Say, praises the progress we’ve made in recycling. He’s right, and like his, our household and office delight in steering recyclables out of our almost empty trashcans into our yellow cans. At home, food waste nourishes our soil and garden. Or, if it’s meat, our dog Moe.     That change in our nature is one big step, but it isn’t enough.

21 years into the culture of sustainable, new Bay times

Weather has a long memory. The cold rain pelting as I write takes me back to Earth Day 21 years ago, when New Bay Times Vol. I No. 1 was delivered to Chesapeake Country under just such a soaking.     We chose Earth Day for our birthday for its significance, not for the weather.

You’ve got too much to do, and it’s our fault

Oh my aching back!         I blame it on Bay Weekly’s Home and Garden Guide. Last week’s 16-page Guide combined with fine spring weather for a weekend of joyful outdoor labor at the Martin-Lambrecht household. Now we’re both moaning.

Expert advice at no charge — and expert help to restore your home and garden

If your home and garden look like mine, we both need help.     Winter 2013-’14 has kept us on the defensive, fending off its blows. There’ve been drafts to keep out, fires to keep burning, limbs to duck, snow to shovel, salt to spread, ice to scrape, birds to feed, falls to heal, floods to staunch, floors to mop … and that’s just my list. I bet you can add a lot more.     Keeping winter from knocking you down takes just about everything you’ve got. Progress is just keeping up.

Meet Helen Tawes and Dawn Lindsay

History months — whether February for Black History or March for Women’s History — strike me as being as much about the march into the future as the march from the past.     That’s my excuse for commemorating Women’s History Month in our pages as March 2014 marches into history.

If it’s right, the EPA needs to hear from us

This week we celebrate Maryland Day.         It’s a great thing to live in a state that knows its past and keeps it alive in legend, song, story and opportunity.     Our feature story, Time Out from the March of Time, guides you to dozens of ways to experience segments of Maryland’s 380-year history, right in the places where history lives on.     We’re also a state that puts great thought into our future. Smart Growth, renewable energy, restoring the Chesapeake are all on our agenda.

The saint’s day gives us the first green of the year — plus an Old Country lesson in sustainability

With spring one more tantalizing week away, we’re grasping at straws that bespeak the awaited season.     Meteorological winter is over and temperatures rising, sometimes imperceptibly, but inevitably until July, our hottest month, has us wishing for a trip to last winter’s icehouse. Peepers and their amphibian brethren are singing, as you know or will on reading this week’s Creature Feature. Crocuses are blooming, at least in some sunny yards. Daffodils are rising, their leaves now standing four to six inches above ground.