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Letter from the Editor

For a week’s worth of words, open Bay Weekly

All the puzzles on Bay Weekly’s expanded Activities Page have me thinking synonymously.

Mine wouldn’t be so harrowing had I had Bay Weekly’s annual Camp Guide

I sure wish I’d had this week’s Camp Guide back when I coerced my mother into sending me 800 miles from home into the wilds of Minnesota for six weeks at Camp Wood ’n’ Aqua.     Parents, read on lest your kids wander into an experience like mine. Our annual Camp Guide will give you choices, and I’ll give you some practical guidelines in the form of questions I wish I, or my parents, had thought to ask.

Eventually, we get big things done

I love the fell swoop. If I paint a room, I want it finished before bedtime. If I find a shrub in the wrong place, I grab the shovel. Got a story idea? I want it now. Done in a day — a week here at Bay ­Weekly — is the hallmark of journalism.     I wish that more things dried as quickly as paint. Or flowed as fast as words.

Should dispelling stereotypes trump history?

You know that conversation on race we’re all supposed to be having? We’ve jumped into it in the midst of Black History Month from the unlikely springboard of a 1940 romantic comedy set in the whites-only high society of Main Line Philadelphia.     This month, 2nd Star Productions tried The Philadelphia Story out on 2016 audiences.     Cast as establishment tycoon George Kittredge, the groom-to-be, in a three-way competition for the love of the female romantic lead was Akili Brown.

Find it in our new Coloring Corner

Not everybody has been lucky in love. So a lucky other’s love story may not universally engender sighs of contentment. If love has done you wrong, your Bay Weekly pick of the week may not be James Baden and Mackenzie Williams’ Love Story, recounted by staff writer Kathy Knotts.     Fortunately, that’s not the whole story of Bay Weekly. Every week, it’s our mission to have something for almost everybody.     This week, we send you a Valentine.

Bay Weekly’s Dining Guide takes the guesswork out of where to go

You and the groundhog may disagree about how much more winter we’ll have.     You may rejoice, or wince, at the decisions of caucusing Iowans.     But no matter your views on politics or weather, I bet you’re tickled at the suggestion to go out for breakfast, lunch or dinner.     Then comes the tough question: Where will we go?     Read on to answer that.

Make a habit of carrying out lunch, and you’ll be as bad as Jonas

Talk about leaving behind litter!         Snowstorm Jonas has left us tons to recycle. Mother Earth will do much of the job, melting the snow and filtering it into groundwater aquifers. Where the piles rise into mountains — as in RFK Stadium where D.C. snow is dumped — a tractor-trailer-sized melter hired from Indiana is speeding up the return of snow to water, which will then be treated before entering the stormwater sewer system that eventually leads to the Bay.

That’s to be feared when work stops on an oyster reef

In a Bay of 700,000 acres, why make a big deal about eight acres?     Could it be because those eight acres are the slippery slope on which restoration of Crassostrea virginica could lose its footing?     With Chesapeake Country under blizzard watch, you can understand why the slippery slope is a dreaded place.     Less understandable is what’s going on at the muddy bottom of the Eastern Shore’s Tred Avon River.     More precisely, not going on.

What’s new in Bay Weekly and beyond

If you were as lucky as I was, the days between Christmas and January 4 belonged to a different time zone. In that week, it’s possible to pretend everything’s done that needs to be done.     Not now! 2016 has come out of the gate like a horse on a fast track with a big purse at its end. It’s already run through its first week and speeding through its second. Things are moving.

Celebrate the season with Bay Weekly’s annual Christmas story

In this season dedicated to peace on earth and shared goodwill, Bay Weekly has a little gift to help you think well of one another.     Our gift is Bay Weekly’s annual Christmas story, in whose telling our writers have found the words to open our hearts to one another. Year after year, they’ve done it.     This year the words belong to Melissa Driscoll Krol whose story, A Christmas Miracle, takes us into the lives of a military family with premature twins and no money.