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Letter from the Editor

This weekend and next, Calvert is the place to listen

      What did you listen to when you were growing up? That’s the question on my mind as I get ready to put this issue of Bay Weekly out of my hands and into yours. You’ll see why this week, and next week, too.       In families with musical talent, singing and playing an instrument is as natural as talking. In many families, church music was the rhythm of life. Musician Rick Hogue, who writes two stories in this issue, says he swayed in utero to the sound of his mother playing church music.

That special space where humans and animals come together

     I’d like to say that animals bring out the best in us. But we all know they bring out the worst, as well. The truth is that our relationships with animals are complicated. I suppose that has more to do with our natures rather than theirs.      So it’s our better natures we look at in this annual dog days of summer issue, Bay Weekly’s Pet Tales.

That’s what we do by telling your stories

Every summer, usually around the All Star break, we watch our favorite baseball movie, Bull Durham. Many of the lines in that good-hearted and now only slightly daring 1988 movie have become quotable, at least by fans.     Lines like How come in former life times, everybody thinks they were somebody famous? How come nobody ever says they were Joe Schmo?

Photoplay for the 21st century

Ever since people could snap pictures, we have.     Brownies (1900-1960) … Polaroids (1948-1998) … disposables (1986) … digitals (since the mid-1990s) … cell-phones (since 2000) …

That’s a question for Congressman Andy Harris

The sturgeon is not the star of Chesapeake ­osteichthyes, the bony fish of the world. That limelight falls on striped bass, the rockfish.     Atlantic sturgeon — finning around the bottom of rivers sucking up aquatic macroinvertebrates, freshwater mussels, snails, crustaceans and small fish — barely make the cast of characters.

It’s a big production

No matter how times keep changing, people keep getting married.

The Case for Oyster Sanctuaries

As you’ll see down the page in Your Say, reader Fred Millhiser continues the discussion opened by my Editor’s Letter of June 22 — “Gov. Hogan: Champion of the Chesapeake? With the title comes accountability”.     I quoted the governor as sharing watermen’s conviction that “rotational harvesting” is good for oyster sanctuaries as well as their own interest.

Read on to find out

Seek and you shall find is the journalist’s creed.      So I was anticipating a full mailbox after I asked in the paper of June 15 for your help in identifying my grandfather’s car.     You came through.     First, on the afternoon of the very day Bay Weekly was delivered throughout Anne Arundel and Calvert counties, was William Hopkins.

With the title comes accountability

As Gov. Larry Hogan revs up his reelection machine, he is burnishing his credentials. In the two weeks since Bay Weekly’s Father’s Day interview in his office, he’s been buddying up with fellow Republicans, “delivering on his promise to transform transit in Baltimore” and carefully styling himself an environmental, and particularly a Chesapeake, champion.

How much — or how little — do we know about the man behind the role?

Who was this man I know as my father? His coincidence with that term is a big deal to me.     To him, fatherhood was one of a long life’s many roles.     In the 36 years before I was born, he was son, grandson, nephew, brother, student, rail-rider, card player, bartender, shore patrolman in the Navy, husband and, as I am now discovering, many things it was not my business to know.     I shared my half-century with him with people dearer and occupations more pressing.