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Letter from the Editor

That’s this season’s urging

     We humans are weather-dependent. After three parched weeks, rain sprinkled on October 8, then drenched the last morning of the Annapolis Sailboat Show. In the days leading up to that rain, I’d heeded Greenstreet Gardens’ emailed alert to water the garden and the birds. Both needed it.

She was a publicist who knew how to pitch her cause

     I said good-bye to a friend this week. Not that I was alone.       Mavis Glander Daly made many friends in her 93 years on this earth. Generations gathered at her farewell. Looking over her beloved Chesapeake watershed — a far sight from her homeland of Montana and South Dakota — from the West River Center, we reflected on what she’d meant to us. 

That’s what our businesses are doing. Are we?

     You sailors and wayfarers of Chesapeake Country know what I mean. You’ve traveled long and far, and your journey, if it happens to be for pleasure, is about to cross over into discontent when — in the middle of nowhere — you bump into just the inn, tavern or gas station you’ve been longing for. 

This week we bring you 50-plus ways to revel in the new season

     Autumn comes to us in many ways.      Meteorological autumn, now three weeks past, came with just the right gifts to be welcome. Clear, dry, comfortable days … cool nights that demanded a light blanket … blue skies that made imaginations soar and sent painters scurrying to capture them … clouds that looked gathered for a new entertainment called Cloud Bounce: For benefits like those, we could let summer go.

We humans can’t stop ourselves from making things

     Whether you’re taking tools to hand, sketching in a notebook, shooting with a camera, setting up an easel or playing at cabaret, you’re demonstrating that homo sapiens is also homo faber. We humans can’t stop ourselves from making things.       In Bay Weekly, we’ve found ourselves drawn to stories about making and makers.   Art en Plein Air

Those school supplies last a lifetime

     Once the ritual of going back to school is no longer yours, it falls into the realm of nostalgia.      Most bad memories fade, courtesy of pain’s blessed inability to be recalled in its actual intensity. The third-grade bully, the looming memory test on the mathematics tables and the hours of confinement are more likely to stay in the past as facts than to haunt the present.      The good memories, however, awaken with each new school year. 

In more ways than one, a lifeline

     What’s Your Line? was a TV quiz show so popular that it ran for 17 seasons — 1950 to 1967 — and 877 episodes. 

This weekend and next, Calvert is the place to listen

      What did you listen to when you were growing up? That’s the question on my mind as I get ready to put this issue of Bay Weekly out of my hands and into yours. You’ll see why this week, and next week, too.       In families with musical talent, singing and playing an instrument is as natural as talking. In many families, church music was the rhythm of life. Musician Rick Hogue, who writes two stories in this issue, says he swayed in utero to the sound of his mother playing church music.

That special space where humans and animals come together

     I’d like to say that animals bring out the best in us. But we all know they bring out the worst, as well. The truth is that our relationships with animals are complicated. I suppose that has more to do with our natures rather than theirs.      So it’s our better natures we look at in this annual dog days of summer issue, Bay Weekly’s Pet Tales.

That’s what we do by telling your stories

Every summer, usually around the All Star break, we watch our favorite baseball movie, Bull Durham. Many of the lines in that good-hearted and now only slightly daring 1988 movie have become quotable, at least by fans.     Lines like How come in former life times, everybody thinks they were somebody famous? How come nobody ever says they were Joe Schmo?