view counter

Letter from the Editor

In every faith, we look ahead in hope

On American’s feast day, Thanksgiving, we look back at “the great and various favors” of our year. I hope you were inspired in your recollection and naming of your blessings this Thanksgiving Day by George Washington’s apt words, quoted in last week’s Letter.     Now we rush full of anticipation into the winter holidays.     These great holidays rise from separate faiths, but all share a common theme. Each turns us toward the future.

Thanksgiving is coming, with Christmas right behind

Perfect Thanksgiving weather, don’t you think?     Propelled by the gusty winds of autumn, fallen leaves dance the season. But not all have fallen, and trees glow with color, green and yellow yielding to scarlet, mahogany and umber, further gilded by long rays of the low sun. Cattails and reeds sway, and pine cones drop, all spreading their seed.     Above us, Vs of honking geese and ducks fly, pulling our eyes skyward to dramatic vistas of cloud and color.

They’re home to big thinkers, big ideas and new technologies

As an early reader of each issue of Bay Weekly, I’ve been thinking about Then & Now, staff writer Kathy Knotts’ story commemorating Annapolis Public Library’s half century on West Street.

Letters home from a new soldier, drafted to fight World War I

November 11 brings us once more to Veterans Day, our nation’s day of remembrance of all our veterans, living and dead. The 96-year-old commemoration began as Armistice Day, celebrating the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month, when soldiers of the Allied Forces and of Germany, the enemy, laid down their weapons.

Is this “Reefer Madness”?

We’re looking forward to fields of marijuana amid the corn and soybeans in Southern Anne Arundel County.     That’s one implication of the semiannual survey Anne Arundel County opinion just released by The Center for the Study of Local Issues at Anne Arundel Community College.     Medical marijuana is riding a high, according to the survey, with 69 percent in favor of allowing its planting, processing and sale in Anne Arundel.

Prepare to be scared

What’s the scardest you’ve ever been?         Our bio-clocks tick in bodies built of ancient stuff, with primal alarms still set. Autumn’s fading light sets off those alarms big time. Three hours had drained from our days between the 15 hours of the Summer Solstice, June 21, and the 12 hours of the Autumnal Equinox on September 23. Soon after Halloween, the night of the spirits, our daylight hours have shrunk to 10, with worse to come. By the Winter Solstice, December 21, we have light for a mere nine hours.

Follow the one to the other and you’ll be surprised at all you see

The coming of the U.S. boat shows to Annapolis each October turns our thoughts toward the water. For all that’s new — and some that’s old — in boats and everything yet imagined to support the boating lifestyle, you go to the shows. In Bay Weekly’s pages, we support that lifestyle with reflections on the meeting points of people, boats and water.

October is fickle; take your fun on the first fair day

For the sake of fair weather for the rest of October, I hope you’ll join me in prayer, rain dance, even in singing Sting’s Heavy Cloud No Rain — whatever your preference. It’s not for my sake I ask; I’m fine with wind, rain and fog. I’m asking for all the folks whose outdoors fun and festivities were rained on, rained out or blown away. Cancellation notices flooded October’s first weekend, dampening plans and spirits.

Bay Weekly’s Fall Fix-up Guide will get you started

October is Fix the Fundamentals Month, according to Free Will Astrologer Rob Brezsny. Boy is he right, and not just for the Capricorns among us.     For this Cancer, at the opposite pole of the zodiac, October is Fix My Fundamentals Month because with the waning of summer’s pleasures, I’ve seen the truth of all that’s been left undone.     Time to turn to home-front chores, so we can go cozy into winter hibernation.

What’s your move?

Sitting at my desk writing about fitness? Something’s wrong here; I can feel it in my posterior. Maybe my bones, too, but the first complainant is the part that meets the chair.     Let’s Move!     I’m ready, but first I’ve got to tell you about a couple of stories. Because I want you to take them to heart, I’ll start from my own.     Like Tom Caraker, hero of Selene San Felice’s story Connecting Lives, I’m a late convert to fitness.