view counter

Things

      For the first two weeks of October, the U.S. Boat Shows are the hottest ticket in Annapolis. 
If the boat bug has bitten you, taken even a little nibble, you’ll walk the blocks of exhibits and miles of floating dock in awe at the wonders of marine technology. As for boats themselves, you’ll see hundreds, including lots of new design trends and models on display with sellers persuasively explaining the merits of their craft.

Boating: Its significance in numbers

      Annapolis knows boating like peanut butter knows jelly. Whether you boat for sport or recreation, our capitol is nautically superior. But just how significant is this seafaring activity?        Facts and figures are powerful in a data-driven world. Last month, the Bureau for Economic Analysis released a report on outdoor recreation from 2012-2016. Outdoor recreation made up $412 billion of the U.S. gross domestic product — that’s 2.2 percent of the entire U.S. GDP.

Instruments play a new tune at orchestra fundraiser

      Ten local artists tackled a different type of canvas for their partnership with the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra. Instead of choosing fiber to capture their artwork, they turned violins into masterpieces of a different sort.       You can see the results Sunday, Sept. 23, when art and music join forces at McBride Gallery for the big reveal of The Painted Violins.

Innovation to make all safer, a few richer

      This year’s accumulating stories of deaths and serious boating accidents on the Bay and our rivers have gotten to me. I no longer leave the dock without donning my inflatable PFD. It was expensive, but it’s comfortable, and I feel safer.
       In Calvert County, the late Tom Clancy’s 537-acre Bay-front estate is on the market. Asking price, $6.2 million.       Peregrine Estate, as the megabucks author of Hunt for the Red October and other best-sellers called it, is a 17,000-square-foot mansion, with a mile of waterfront and its own fossil-filled cliff.
       It was a long hot summer. With (hopefully) many days packed with fun in the sun and on the water, we look forward to those days when ­summer’s humidity has finally been wrung out and a cool breeze greets us every morning.
       Autumn is on the horizon. The air is light, skies often blue and leaves full of color. It’s one of Chesapeake Country’s most splendid seasons.
       This issue of Bay Weekly shows you how to sweetly kiss summer goodbye and welcome the wonders of fall. Here are 50 Ways to Leave Your Summer, a chronology of fun, fare and festivals stretching from early September through Thanksgiving.
1 Eat Local, Eat Well 

Play to remember — and repay

After Michael Schrodel’s early death in 2001, his family and brothers of Sigma Tau Gamma fraternity of Frostburg State University hosted a golf tournament to celebrate his life and memory.
Election Day Comes Early Vote June 26 … or June 14-21       Maryland’s Primary Election day is June 26, with polls open statewide from 7am to 8pm.      Can’t wait that long?

Get to know a local icon

      Thomas Point Shoal Lighthouse is an iconic image of Maryland and Chesapeake Bay. It provides a reassuring mark for mariners. Its image is routinely borrowed for art and souvenirs. It was the runner-up image on the Maryland state quarter. A national historic landmark, it holds the distinction of surviving as the only light of its type in its original Chesapeake location. 

Greene Turtle switches to paper — on request

      The Greene Turtle Sports Bar and Grille, named in honor of a 110-million-year-old creature, is banning plastic straws to save the turtle. Beginning on World Turtle Day, May 23, the entire empire of 48 East Coast locations is removing straws from its drinks. If you’re drinking at Greene Turtle and want a straw, you’ll get a paper one — on request.