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Places

Growing and thriving over 43 years

     Do you smell the roasting smoked turkey legs? Hear the clanging of steel as jousters meet on the field of battle? Spot courtiers from the 1500s showing up in everyday scenes?       Yes, it’s that time of year again. The Renaissance Festival is Chesapeake Country’s unofficial sign that summer is ending.

Honor the memory of the enslaved

      August 25 marks the 400th anniversary of the first landing of enslaved Africans in English-occupied North America. They arrived on the White Lion, an English privateer ship sailing under Dutch authority, at Point Comfort in Hampton, Virginia, now part of Fort Monroe National Monument, a unit of the National Park System.

Maryland’s senators use their ­summer break to learn about the communities they serve

      When the U.S. Congress goes on summer vacation, senators and representatives head home. With Congress in long summer recess — all of August and the first week of September — our two senators are visiting communities in Maryland from the ocean to the mountains.

Must we eat our way out of this problem?

     Stopping at Bob Evans Seafood in Shady Side, Lou Hyde reports he routinely finds blue catfish in his 240 crab pots in Herring Bay. Some of the horned invaders are so fat that he tears up his pots cutting them loose.       Mick Blackistone, fishmonger, worries that they’re eating juvenile crabs.
You have to get up early if you’re going to fill your basket
     “Nothing is better than being on the water in the morning,” I tell my skeptical family as we head out the door at 5:45am.       We are meeting Captain Trey Plumb and my colleague Audrey at Collins Marine Railway in Deale. Plumb, owner of FishMermaniac Charters, is a Maryland native and a lifelong waterman. He has been fishing the Bay, its tributaries and the Atlantic Ocean for more than 30 years. Five years ago, he expanded his business by offering crabbing charters.

Turning a crab feast into an eco-success

       Twenty-two hundred crab-lovers filled their bellies with crabs, barbecue, beer and watermelon at the 74th Annapolis Rotary Crab Feast earlier this month.             Trash cans were filled as well, with shells, claws, cups and plates. Instead of the landfill, all that waste is going to recycling.

Research begins on who was who, when, on Parkers Creek

      “For more than 10,000 years, people have hunted, fished, worked and made their homes around what would come to be known as Parkers Creek in Calvert County,” according to the American Chestnut Land Trust.             To begin research on how the people in the Parkers Creek area and their culture “shaped local heritage,” the Trust has been awarded $20,000 from the Maryland Heritage Area Authority.

Kids On the Creek get to know the water

      Visit Truxton Park in Annapolis Saturday, August 24, with your kids and they’ll learn who’s swimming in Spa Creek. Biologists will identify the fish you pull up in seines. They’ll also hear about the 12 types of animals that make the park home and enjoy a scavenger hunt with prizes.             Experienced captains are standing by to take kids out on the water. Or you might try out paddleboards.

Modern Girl Scouts train to be ­leaders and innovators

      Today’s Girl Scouts want to be known for more than just cookies. The organization encourages the modern Girl Scout to become Go-getters, Innovators, Risk-takers and Leaders. G.I.R.L.s in other words — or initials.

Motorcyclists carry the flame into town

      Local families who have lost a soldier are expecting visits from a dedicated band of motorcyclists, who will present them with a memorial plaque of distinguished service.        American Legion Post 175 in Severna Park is hosting the 15 to 20 motorcyclists, arriving August 1 and visiting families August 2. Their mission is to remind those left behind that their fallen hero hasn’t been forgotten.