view counter

People

Arts Alliance show celebrates the elements

      Weather plays out in high drama on the Bay’s big stage. In stormy weather, clouds sweep the sky in roiling 3D Technicolor, complete with sound and light effects.       In calmer weather, the blue sky repeats itself in blue water. Sunrise and sunset pull out their rainbow palettes. Sun and moon dance in gold and silver shimmers on the water.      No wonder artists are inspired by the drama of weather on the water.

Local family adds meat to your Eat Local repertoire

     Fourth-generation Anne Arundel County farmer Deana Tice wants to bring out the carnivore in your locavore.       “Most families don’t have the farm connection any more. Everyone needs to know where food comes from and how it’s raised,” she says. So Tice has made it her mission to “share our farm and agricultural lifestyle as much as possible.”
Colin Rees explores changing seasons
     Birds led Colin Rees — a former environmental advisor for the World Bank — to Jug Bay Wetlands Sanctuary. There he discovered a wider love, of the natural world, so strong it led to his latest book, Nature’s Calendar: A Year in the Life of a Wildlife Sanctuary. 

Hoisting sails teaches life skills

    As the Woodwind drifted from the sunlit waters of the Annapolis marina, seven young sailors prepared to sail the 74-foot schooner into the Chesapeake Bay and back.      The crew — a mix of preteen boys and girls garbed in bright-green T-shirts — hailed from Brendan Sailing, a local school teaching life skills to children with learning differences. Many of the children have autism, ADHD and dyslexia.

Woman of many faces hops from one century to the next, bringing to life amazing women of history
 

Was that Amelia Earhart you bumped into at the grocery store?  Julia Child, Clara Barton, or even Sally Ride at the mall?     You are not seeing things. I change into and out of corsets, wigs, and hoop skirts several times each day to hop from one century to the next for my fascinating job. I’m Mary Ann Jung, an award-winning actress and Smithsonian scholar who’s lucky to make a wonderful living performing shows about amazing women in history.

Chesapeake Biological Laboratory ­thinking globally, acting locally

How long does it take for a common plastic straw — the kind familiar to customers in virtually every restaurant, café and coffee shop — to disintegrate once it’s used and discarded?     Six months? One year? Three years? Ten years?     The right answer, says marine biologist Helen Bailey, is an astonishing average of 200 years.

DaJuan Gay refused to give up

After a two-year battle to win a seat, DaJuan Gay, 22, was sworn in on Monday, July 8, 2019.     DaJuan is the youngest city council member in Annapolis history upon winning the special election for Ward 6 with a write-in campaign, for whom any Ward 6 resident regardless of political party could vote.     Gay first ran for the council seat 2017, at the age of 19, losing to ­Shaneka Henson.

After more than a century in the water, keeping Thomas Point alive is no easy task 

 

      As Thomas Point Shoal Lighthouse loomed ever closer in the brackish waters of Chesapeake Bay, John Potvin placed one leg on the edge of Audacious, a pristine white deadrise.      The fishing boat’s engine roared and sputtered as it neared the historic landmark: a towering, red-and-white circular house squating on crisscrossed metal beams. 

Two of 10 National Heritage Fellows 

 

     The Old Line State is rich when it comes to art and culture. At least that’s the way we see it by having not one, but two Maryland artists named recipients of the 2019 National Heritage Fellowships. Only 10 were chosen nationwide.      Decoy carver Rich Smoker of Marion Station and Linda Goss of Baltimore have both been awarded the nation’s highest honor in the folk and traditional arts.

Gov. Hogan gearing up for Bay battle

 

     We soon may see how much clout GOP Gov. Larry Hogan has in Washington Republican circles.      Last week, the Democratic-run U.S. House upped to $85 million next year’s allocation for the Chesapeake Bay Program.      As we know, the Trump administration wants to gut the Bay program and other watershed restorations around the country. The White House said okay to about $7 million, but no more.