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People

Andrew Wildermuth, 19, Mayo

I love people, and I love the Chesapeake.     In my year of writing for Bay Weekly, I have wanted to make my own column. Something unique, something bold, something that digs into the DNA of the region. I’ve bought a nice camera and gained huge inspiration from Humans Of New York, the online blog that captures the essence of New York with daily interviews, randomly chosen from its interesting inhabitants.

You’ve got muscle

This single day carries a heavy weight.    

Tirrell Smith, 20, Glen Burnie

When my dad my passed, it was hard.  But even widowed, Mom has always been there for us. Financially or not, she’s there to uplift her kids. And that’s what’s important because everyone needs to hear that one sweet word for their mom.

Graham Hays, 18, Riva

My friend Hugh and I just laid hands on a 26-foot, 1970s’ Catalina 27 fixer-upper. Barnacles infest the rudder and hull, and there are stains and chipped paint. This summer we plan to haul the boat out of the water and repair it. Then we will take it on Fleet Week. Six friends will man this ship and take to the Bay for a whole week, sailing from port to port.     Having our first boat is an amazing feeling, even more so than a car because the boundaries are virtually limitless. Plus, it’s more comfortable to sleep in.

Plant scientist Bert Drake warns that in Earth’s changing climate, plants are odds-on winners. It doesn’t look so good for us.

Hailing from Maine, Bert Drake likes cool weather. So you’d expect him to be riled about a world getting warmer. The issue is more than comfort, says the plant physiologist, who retired in 2010 after a 40-year career at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center in Edgewater.     Like Noah, Drake worries about flooding. And crop failure, which would have been an issue for Noah, too. Drake, however, might top Noah on the anxiety scale, for he’s got drought on his mind as well.     How did he get so anxious?

Alana Johnson: In her own words

"Of course I know about Earth Day!         I just started my garden. I’m growing strawberries, zucchini, squash and mammoth sunflowers. You should’ve seen those sunflowers last year. They were huge — taller than me.

Jan Miles was bred to captain Maryland’s ­historic clipper ship

The man who grew up to be the captain of Pride of Baltimore II, one of the great tall ships of our age, started his sailing career in Annapolis in the late 1960s.     Jan Miles grew up in a family that sailed for fun, mostly overseas where his father was stationed as a foreign service officer. When the family retired to Annapolis, the teenage Jan had trouble adjusting to life in the states.     “My parents thought it would be good for me to take a year off to collect my wits,” Miles relates.

We have food pantries all over the state. Why not furniture pantries?

Bruce Michalec’s bank needs a new vault. Deposits are bigger than ever in the three months since Anne Arundel County Food & Resources Bank merged with the Maryland Food Bank. Soon, all the food will crowd out the resources.     Michalec founded a food bank for Anne Arundel County in 1985. Soon, need and opportunity combined to bring other resources like furniture and medical supplies into the bank.

Anne Arundel Community ­College president Dawn ­Lindsay puts her money on empowering people

At Anne Arundel Community College, where two out of three students are women, women’s history is a forward-heading story. Dawn Lindsay continues a two-decade tradition of female leadership, following Martha Smith, who served 18 years as college president.     Lindsay took over in August, 2012, leaving Glendale Community College in California, where she was also president, for “the place I’d had my eye on for some time, an amazing college with a great national reputation.”

A garden named for this Maryland first lady is a fine place to encounter spring

Spring is here, calling us outdoors.          Sample the season at Helen Avalynne Gibson Tawes Garden, an out-of-the-way treasure hidden in plain sight at Maryland Department of Natural Resources headquarters in the Tawes Building.     The gardens are known to local birders as a hotspot for migrating warblers in April, when waves of Virginia bluebells bloom along the walkways.