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Scott Sylte stands firm for his service dog

As the sun dips into the Bay at the Calvert County marina where he lives, 59-year-old Scott Sylte stares into the Chesapeake. He likes an angry sea. With salt-and-pepper beard and a skipper’s cap, he more closely resembles a sea captain than the human rights champion he is.     He doesn’t like the word activist — but it fits him.

Back then we had gardens; now we have Whole Foods

     Biggest problem in today’s society? I think electronics. Children watch too much TV. They have too many toys. They should be going outside, learning how to communicate, exercising.     I grew up in Boston. We would play outside. Football, baseball, hiking. When you’re little, you don’t need video games. I just don’t think you need that. We had cartoons; watched them every once in a while. Not every day; just every once in a while.

Marshall Coffman’s martial ministry

     “You learn through both winning and losing,” says 70-year-old Marshall Coffman, who leads a double life.     As the Reverend Dr. Coffman, he is associate pastor of the Christian Fellowship of Calvert County in Owings. As Sensei Coffman, he is head instructor of Budokan Judo Club at Northeast Community Center. Combining roles, he leads the Judo for Jesus ministry.     This summer, Sensei Coffman earned the lofty rank of fifth-degree black belt.

An American in Annapolis

     I moved here from El Salvador 25 years ago. I came to try to have a better life. Especially for my sons and daughters. If I come here I can make more, I can give whatever my kids ask for.     Of course it was hard culturally. But more than anything, the language was difficult. It was scary. When someone asks you something, you don’t understand. You can’t respond because you don’t know what they’re saying. It took me about two years to adjust to the culture and language.

Creativity comes out to play in Twin Beach Players’ Kids
Playwriting Festival

     For stage-smitten elementary-, middle- and high-schoolers, winning a spot in Twin Beach Players Kids Playwriting Festival means they’ve made it to the All-Star Game. The nine-year-old competition — open to all school-age children in Maryland — gives kids their moment to shine with an added bonus: $100 for top six winning plays.     But it’s love, not money, that sparks these playwrights.

Talent Machine’s young actors are rehearsing for life

     Talent Machine is a gifted crew of kids and volunteers who make magic for audiences of every age. This year, the seven- to 14-year-old troupe is working on Peter Pan; the kids have learned lines, choreography and music to captivate audiences. From this experience, they’ll take away more than memories and new friends.     As actors, they have learned to manage their time, to carry on when things didn’t go according to plan and to work with different people. Most of all, they have gained confidence in themselves.

Bay Weekly’s here!

That’s front desk receptionist Yvonne Anderson’s emailed message to Maryland Department of Agriculture staff every Thursday, as soon as driver Bill Visnansky makes that Harry S Truman Parkway stop on his Annapolis route.     Where do you get your Bay Weekly? Send your favorite pick-up spot and a photo to editor@bayweekly.com.

Working at Dick and Jane’s in ­Harwood

Harner: With the late winter, things have been late comin’. It’s the first time it’s ever been this late.     Englom: The first crop of peaches was taken out by the last late frost. We’re famous for our peaches, too. But we won’t be seeing many local ones for a few weeks.

Flying the flag in Davidsonville

Love for your country is something we all agree on.     At these World Cup parties, when all of your friends and family look at the flag and hold their hands on their hearts, it’s a truly beautiful sight. Obviously it’s a fun and goofy time in dressing decked out in red, white and blue for parties, but there’s something more serious underneath that rings true for all Americans, reminding us that we live in such a beautiful country.

Playing in Annapolis: "It's always a good time."

When I go downtown with my guitar, it’s impossible to not meet new people. I’ve met a lot of crazy characters while playing downtown — plenty of funny drunk people, but other musicians too.