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For George Phelps, half a century fighting for civil rights

Strolling down memory lane is more than a figure of speech to George Phelps, who can see his new namesake street from his backyard.     At his street-naming ceremony, Mayor Josh Cohen, City Alderwoman Classie Hoyle, County Councilman Chris Trumbauer, Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman and Maryland Sen. John Astle paid their respects.     “I want you to know that I appreciate it from the very depths of my heart,” Phelps said.

The rewarding culmination of a long environmental quest

A light went on for environmental guru Dick Lahn, of Crofton, back in 1967, at a League of Conservation Voters lecture.     “I was working as a mathematician for NASA, and suddenly I knew that protecting our environment was what I really wanted to do.”     The Ah-ha! moment has shaped Lahn’s life into a String of Pearls that unites Baywide land preservation, art and a treasure hunt.     Along the way, Lahn has strung a strand of environmental successes.

In celebration of Father’s Day, dads from 19 to 94 tell us what they like best about the job

           

On Memorial Day we pay a debt that binds us in perpetuity

The blood shed in our Civil War was barely dry when we paid the first installment on this great debt of remembrance. But the losses were fresh and sharp, like amputations that cut away limbs, that would have been sent into the future by families, neighborhoods, communities, counties, states and our divided government. New estimates suggest 720,000 died fighting that war.

Free deposits and free withdrawals keep this bank solvent

Last year, Bruce Michalec’s bank gave away $1.25 million. It was his busiest in 27 years, but 2013 is on track to break the 2012 record. That’s because hunger and need are the forces that drive the growth of Anne Arundel County’s central food bank.     Hunger is an everyday thing, says Michalec, whose bank started small back in 1985 with “a truck, a freezer and a place to put it all.” That first place was a building rented from the Cedar Grove United Methodist Church in Deale.

SERC scientist triples blue crab population

Chesapeake Country has a Green Giant. Tuck Hines may not be green as Kermit or big as Andre the Giant, but his work to save the Bay’s blue crab population has earned him Washingtonian Magazine’s gigantic title.     When the Bay’s blue crab population fell to 255 million, Hines and his Smithsonian Environmental Research Center team convinced Maryland Department of Natural Resources to change harvest regulations.

Statistics can’t tell the stories of these average mothers

A Kansas City Barbeque Judge gives Bay Weekly the deets

Is each piece of meat evenly cut? Does it look appetizing? Are the pieces neatly arranged? What kind of garnish did the chef use?     All these questions are answered in the first 30 seconds by Kansas City Barbeque Society judge Jorge Alday, who is judging the Parole Rotary Club’s Naptown barBAYq contest this weekend.     He bases his first score on appearance: a 2 looks inedible, a 9 is perfect.

Calvert Library’s Pat Hofmann discusses what makes libraries special places — for us and for our communities

"The library is poppin’,” Bay Weekly calendar editor Ashley Brotherton tells me late Monday.     Her report means I have a couple of hours of editing ahead of me on a hefty 8 Days a Week calendar muscled up by Anne Arundel and Calvert libraries.

John Maounis marked the trail for you

The Chesapeake Bay is not any old park. When is the last time you saw a park that was entirely on the water?     When John Maounis started work as superintendent at the National Park Service Chesapeake Bay office seven years ago, he had never seen such a thing either. His job was to find the best way for the National Park Service to be a part of Bay protection.