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Our loss is Virginia’s gain

Halting the planned next step of oyster restoration in the Tred Avon River has meant losing a pretty penny. One million dollars allocated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers goes instead to Virginia. Oysters and the whole Bay environment will still benefit, but Maryland’s change of direction may have implications for future federal funding — if and when work resumes.

Light House Center benefits

Three thousand dollars toward ending homelessness in Annapolis. That’s the takeaway from Heritage Baptist Church’s 10th Annual SOUPer Bowl Lunch for the Light House Homeless Prevention and Support Center. Thus, the free lunch prepared by Blackwall Hitch Chef Zachary Pope cost each of its 300-plus eaters about $10. Not a bad price for high-end chili, chicken noodle or baked potato soups along with salad, bread and dessert. Plus, of course, a good cause.

Calvert Marine Museum hosts country star June 4

Love Chris Young? You’ll be counting the days till June 4. That’s when you get to join the sexiest man in country music under the stars at Calvert Marine Museum’s first concert of the 2016 season.     Museum members get first shot at tickets on April 5, with public sales following.

But skip GoFundMe

Like many construction projects, the Tiny House Capstone project at South River High School has hit a snag. The project’s GoFundMe donation campaign has been ended, and GoFundMe donors are receiving refunds.     STEM Green Architecture and Sustainable Design class, under the direction of Michael Bartek and Matthew Schrader, are designing the tiny House. Center of Applied Technology South students, under James Turek, are building it. Students plan to finish the house this school year and to donate it to Arlington Echo Outdoor Education Center.

$1,000 can buy a lot of books

The Lothian Ruritan Club is offering nine $1,000 scholarships to graduating seniors in southern Anne Arundel County and northern Calvert County to study at two- and four-year colleges or trade schools. Funds are raised in annual sales of citrus, Burger Burns and spaghetti dinners, as well as contributions and endowments from Ruritan members. Deadline is Feb. 23:

Is there a smarter way to package our takeout?

Let’s talk lunch.          As a child, each day I carried to school a packed lunch in a metal Holly Hobbie lunch box, later replaced by Wonder Woman.     As an adult, I sometimes remember to pack a lunch from home. But more often than not, lunch is carryout.     Bay Weekly prides itself on running an eco-friendly office, and we try to recycle the majority of our waste. Yet the sheer volume of take-out packaging that ends up in the garbage is disturbing.

Should we give up plastic bags?

A convenience that has gotten out of hand, plastic bags remind me of the Sorcerer’s Apprentice. The Disney cartoon from Fantasia is one of my favorite feats of imagination. In search of ease, Mickey Mouse, the apprentice, puts a spell on his mop and bucket. But he hasn’t learned enough sorcery to limit the spell, and his labor-saving devices multiply beyond his power to control them.

When the snow starts falling, the cavalry mount their plows to reclaim our roads

When snow falls, George Sharps goes to battle.     As you read weather reports, he is revving his plow to be ready to fight his nemesis.     Sharps is one of 350 Maryland State Highway Administration operators who brave conditions that should keep the rest of us home. His mission: to clear 17,000 miles of state roads. He has one request of the citizens of Maryland as we send him into battle: “Stay home and let us do our jobs.”

Send your hope into the future. Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center at Grasonville seeks “passionate individuals” to come together on a mission to create a legacy of protecting the environment for future generations. Through nine weeks of “fascinating” educational sessions, the Class of 2016 will gain knowledge on restoration and stewardship of the Chesapeake Bay.