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Consignment auction raises funds for Anne Arundel County Young Farmers

Farming for Our Heritage is printed on T-shirts proudly worn by young farmers of Anne Arundel County. Their love of the soil and its bounty is inherited from parents and grandparents.     For many, it’s a heritage as close as it is deep. “Many of the members are active on their own family farms,” says Mark Hopkins, one of about 20 Anne Arundel County Young Farmers ranging in age from 18 to 35. Most work in farming part-time, usually keeping a job while raising corn, ­barley, soybeans, wheat and hay.

Churches on a mission to save the Bay

Yes, we’ll gather at the river, The beautiful, the beautiful river; Gather with the saints at the river That flows by the throne of God. –Hymn by Robert Lowry  

Lend your boat and experience to help keep America at the forefront of technology

The Bay beats a classroom for teaching science, ­technology, engineering and math.     Many good sailors believe sailing is an art. All great sailors know that sailing is about the science, math and engineering that go into designing, building and piloting a modern sailboat. That’s not news at the National Sailing Hall of Fame in Annapolis.

Help Calvert Start a Barn Quilt Trail

If barns aren’t the place you’d look for quilts, maybe you’re sticking too close to home. “Thousands of barn quilts exist around the country including some in Garrett County and Carroll County,” explains Bob Carpenter, executive director of the Arts Council of Calvert County.     A barn quilt is a replica of one square from a quilt, painted on plywood (usually eight by eight feet) and mounted on the side of barn.

Help for affording college

Right now is the time to apply for scholarships. Here are four.     The Coast Guard Foundation awards scholarships ranging from $1,000 to $5,000 to children of Coast Guard members present or past. Deadline March 15: bit.ly/1WhEcv4.     The Calvert Marine Museum’s Fossil Club offers the $500 Betty (Sandy) Roberts Scholarship for Natural Sciences to graduating seniors in Southern Maryland in pursuit of post-secondary education in natural sciences. Deadline March 31: calvertmarinemuseum.com/DocumentCenter/View/2017.

Roadside buffers trap pollution in their roots

It’s not too early for planting trees — especially when you’ve got the digging power of the Maryland State Highway Administration. They’re busy planting roadside buffers of 8,700 trees in Anne Arundel County. Deciduous and evergreen in mixed rows, those trees will improve the health of the Chesapeake watershed by capturing pollution-producing nitrogen and phosphorus in their root systems.

The Bay’s 19 riverkeepers are part of a worldwide force of 275

Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot, Nothing is going to get better. It’s not. –Dr. Seuss: The Lorax
  

Among your wait staff are bats, hamsters and killer whales

Spirited conversation keeps the atmosphere companionable at Zü Coffee, home of the friendliest wait staff as voted by readers of Bay Weekly. At the Waugh Chapel location, customers chat with the staff about their spirit animals.     Spirit animals arise from the shamanic tradition where they are paired with initiates to the practice, who can then turn to them for guidance in their lives. Informally, New Age seekers may identify with spirit animals that represent qualities they wish were theirs.

Hockey fans celebrate at their favorite watering holes

Fans of the Washington Capitals hockey team are having a smashing time. With a star-studded roster and a feared offense, the Caps have dominated their National Hockey League division for months and all but clinched a spot in the playoffs, beginning in mid-April.     Fans don’t need to brave the crowds at Verizon Center to watch their favorite team skate on to another victory. Area bars make it easy to cheer for the team.

Smithsonian Environmental Research ­Center in for the long haul

If you’ve ever planted a tree in your back yard, you’ve experienced the thrill of watching it grow from a ­knobby sapling into a towering oak or weeping willow. Multiply that by 20,000, and you’ll have some idea what Smithsonian ecologist John Parker is doing in his experimental forest in Edgewater.     It’s called BiodiversiTree, and the project is designed to last a century. On March 15, Parker explains the project in a Smithsonian Environmental Research Center evening lecture.