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Annapolis is a wild place to live.             That’s the conclusion of the National Wildlife Federation, which has certified our capital city as a Community Wildlife Habitat. In such a place, the human population of roughly 38,000 is dwarfed by legions of creatures that crawl, hop, slither, fly, dart and lope as they did when the world was young, before humans took over.     Getting back to nature took work, not neglect.

Sketches of Annapolis Primary candidates

Scarce as candidates are, Annapolis’ chambers won’t be empty come November. Thirteen Annapolitans have stepped up, enough to fill all eight council seats and offer Primary voters a choice in the mayoral race and in two of the eight wards.     The nine in competition answered questions and stated their views in an 11th-hour forum sponsored by local chapters of the Sierra Club and League of Conservation Voters. Enough likely voters showed up that the Heritage Baptist Church parking lot looked like a revival was on the calendar.

Do we care who runs this town?

What do we want our capital city to do for us?     Smooth our commuter visit by land and sea?     Give us places to go and things to do, by day and night?     Provide a walkable historic core?     Give us model environmental integrity in lighting, noise control, stormwater and waste management?     Maybe just stay green?     Without doubt, we want a good place to live and do business where we’re proud to bring visiting family and friends.

A first-time Chesapeake fisherwoman from Virginia beats the odds

Diamond Jim has been caught.         True to the legend tagged to him by Maryland Department of Natural Resources, he brought riches to his captor.

Launched from Wallops Island, LADEE on its way to lunar orbit

Was your eye on the sky at 11:27 Friday night, September 6?     Did LADEE’s takeoff burn an arc into your vision and memory?     LADEE — short for NASA Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer — is intended to be a close observer of the moon.

Fund your good cause with a Rotary Crab Feast grant

The leftovers from the Rotary Club of Annapolis’s 68th annual crab feast last month will feed, clothe and otherwise enrich the Annapolis community. Just how begins with you. Explain how you and your organization would use a share of the take, up to $5,000, in a project to improve the local quality of life for “as many people as possible.” Turn your plan into a grant application due by year’s end at www.annapolisrotary.org.

Public transportation on the move in Calvert County

Calvert County has 750 miles of roads, led by Rt. 2/4, which unwinds like a wide ribbon down the county’s center. That temptation to put the pedal to the metal is made for cars, as is most of modern-day Calvert County.

Grants for exploring Anne Arundel Heritage

There’s money waiting to help you share heritage experiences within Anne Arundel County’s Four Rivers Heritage Area, encompassing the Severn, South, Rhode and West rivers. Grants up to $2,500 are funded with our tax dollars, disbursed through the Maryland Heritage Area Authority’s revolving fund refreshed with $3 million annually.

Build your strength while extending your reach beyond arm’s length

For bicycle riders in the Haiti 80, your pleasure in speed and endurance bring hope and help to the school children in the poorest nation in the Western Hemisphere, where more than half the people live on less than one dollar a day. La Resurrection School in Gros Morne has been under the wing of St. Martins-in-the-Field Episcopal Church in Severna Park for 28 years. A newer bright idea, only two years old, puts some spin on that partnership.

Twelve-year-old Colton Clayton caught a Maryland record largemouth bass while fishing at a farm pond in his hometown of Huntingtown, in Calvert County, on July 31. The fish was 11 pounds, 6 ounces, 26 inches long and 18 inches around. Clayton caught the fish using a spinning rod loaded with eight-pound test line and a plastic worm, rigged weedless and without a weight.