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Study safe boating — online and free

Every voyage can lead to Scylla and Charbydis. Mariners have always known that monsters of the sea are both real and hungry. Smart — and lucky — mariners live to tell the tale.     That’s the kind of boater you want to be.     Boating safety courses — offered by the wise mariners of the Coast Guard Auxiliary and Power Squadron — improve your odds for steering safely around rocks, whirlpools and other monsters of the deep.

Turning Cove Point into an energy exporter is a big deal for Calvert County, and for America

Dominion Cove Point LNG moved a big step closer to an historic transformation last week. The big energy mover on little Calvert County’s southern Bay shore won the U.S. Department of Energy’s approval to export American natural gas, in liquefied form, to any nation that wants to buy.         The date was September 11, a portentous anniversary both for the nation and for the LNG terminal’s history.

West River Wickets take their croquet mallets to Maryland ­Senior Olympics

Bill Brewer plays croquet with the dedication of a founding father.     From his back yard, croquet rose from an excuse for a party “with lots of rum” to a championship game played by ambitious senior Olympians.     Next week, Maryland Senior Olympics competition adds its first croquet tournament. Brewer’s team, the nationally recognized West River Wickets Croquet Club, will be there to strike for gold.

Bay Gardener Frank Gouin honored for community good deeds

For the difference he makes in “the fabric of life for South County residents,” Bay Gardener Frank Gouin was honored this week with the Southern Anne Arundel Chamber of Commerce’s annual Gene Hall Community Service Award.     “He’s done so much for the community in so many levels,” says Chamber board member John Hiser, last year’s Hall award winner.

It’s what’s underneath that counts

You wouldn’t think it to look at him, but Spiggy is this year’s Calvert You Are Beautiful Volunteer. Yes, Richard ‘Dave’ Spigler, the guy who added frump to female impersonation by donning a hog nose, big-hair wig and old grandma dress. The very Spiggy whom with a cadre of friends, formed the Washingon Redskins’s Hogettes cheering section for 19 years.     The beauty beneath that surface is a big heart dedicated to raising big bucks for good causes.
Annapolis is a wild place to live.             That’s the conclusion of the National Wildlife Federation, which has certified our capital city as a Community Wildlife Habitat. In such a place, the human population of roughly 38,000 is dwarfed by legions of creatures that crawl, hop, slither, fly, dart and lope as they did when the world was young, before humans took over.     Getting back to nature took work, not neglect.

Sketches of Annapolis Primary candidates

Scarce as candidates are, Annapolis’ chambers won’t be empty come November. Thirteen Annapolitans have stepped up, enough to fill all eight council seats and offer Primary voters a choice in the mayoral race and in two of the eight wards.     The nine in competition answered questions and stated their views in an 11th-hour forum sponsored by local chapters of the Sierra Club and League of Conservation Voters. Enough likely voters showed up that the Heritage Baptist Church parking lot looked like a revival was on the calendar.

Do we care who runs this town?

What do we want our capital city to do for us?     Smooth our commuter visit by land and sea?     Give us places to go and things to do, by day and night?     Provide a walkable historic core?     Give us model environmental integrity in lighting, noise control, stormwater and waste management?     Maybe just stay green?     Without doubt, we want a good place to live and do business where we’re proud to bring visiting family and friends.

A first-time Chesapeake fisherwoman from Virginia beats the odds

Diamond Jim has been caught.         True to the legend tagged to him by Maryland Department of Natural Resources, he brought riches to his captor.

Launched from Wallops Island, LADEE on its way to lunar orbit

Was your eye on the sky at 11:27 Friday night, September 6?     Did LADEE’s takeoff burn an arc into your vision and memory?     LADEE — short for NASA Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer — is intended to be a close observer of the moon.