view counter


Follow the Capitol Christmas Tree

In a 45-year-old tradition, the Christmas tree that shines throughout December on the lawn of the U.S. Capitol is cut in a national forest in a different state each year.     This year’s Capitol Christmas Tree, a towering 74-foot Lutz spruce, was cut in Alaska’s Chugach National Forest on October 27. Two cranes were needed to lift the 7,500-pound tree from its 90-year home.

It’s Maryland’s first propane-fueled school bus

The Blue Bird school bus that picked up Glen Burnie public school students on November 3 was an innovation, though its riders may not have noticed. What makes it different from any other Type C school bus is what goes in the tank: propane auto gas. Bus No. 789, the newest in contractor Randall Jubb’s Bus Service, Inc.’s fleet, is Maryland’s first school bus fueled by propane.

Eighth-grader Kelsey ­Cashman’s tops Anne Arundel Library’s makeFashion Showcase

When Kelsey Cashman walks her dog Declan on a cold dark, winter night, they’ll both be comfortable. Declan wears the long fur coat of a golden retreiver. His 13-year-old mistress is warm as just-popped toast in the heated cape that took the St. Mary’s School eight-grader to the top of the class in STEM fashion     Cashman won’t need a flashlight to light their way, for her blue herringbone self-warming cape is trimmed in LED lights.

Navy Captain Fred foote uses poetry to soothe the battle-scarred

Loader and gunner, brothers from boot camp days, they came in one platoon to the shock of war; daily they clung to each other for strength and grace — each promised to bring the other home once more. Now both return: two versions of amputee –from “Bonded,” by Fred Foote  

“Dump Dominion” banner unfurled by We Are Cove Point

A pair of Cove Point protestors dropped from the upper deck of Bank of America Stadium during Nov. 2’s Monday Night Football game. In the Charlotte, N.C., stadium, an anticipated sellout crowd of close to 75,000 people were on hand for third-quarter play between the Carolina Panthers and the Indianapolis Colts.     Based on recent Monday Night Football audiences, an estimated 12 million more were watching on television.

Come, learn and share your history

Seven hundred were way more guests than Maryland State Archives director of outreach Emily Oland Squires planned for at last year’s innaugural Family History ­Festival.     “I would have been happy if we had more people than staff,” she told Bay Weekly in 11th-hour planning for the second festival.     No matter how many people come to the Archives, in Annapolis, Saturday, November 7, she and Archives staff will have room. Especially for you.

Lighthouse keeper John White returns to his one-time home after four decades

In John White’s boyhood in Charlotte, North Carolina, schools and water fountains were separated for whites and colored. Rising from the final years of segregation, he could not imagine his future self, as the first black man in command of Thomas Point Shoal Lighthouse, ushering in its 100th year of service in 1975.     He got a glimpse of his future when his two older brothers were drafted into the Army for the Vietnam War.     In 1969, the year he graduated high school, White too was drafted.

Celebrated Chesapeake writer and advocate Tom Horton on the state of our beloved estuary

Excerpted from a talk at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center’s 50th anniversary lecture series (Editor’s note: Horton’s words have been rearranged in the shape of this story)

Greenstreet Growers uses land wisely

For using land wisely so as to preserve it for future generations, Greenstreet Growers is Anne Arundel Soil Conservation District’s 2015 Conservationist of the Year. Greenstreet Growers has been at the forefront of agriculture in South County since 2000, growing bedding annuals and perennials in commercial greenhouses for both retail and wholesale customers. In those years it has installed soil-saving, pollution-reducing innovations including grassed waterways, heavy-use area protections, irrigation management systems, pond and roof runoff structures.

Franklin Point State Park opens after 17-year wait

Keeping South County rural seems to be a motto with might behind it.     A former ground of contention is opening as Franklin Point State Park. After stalwart citizens and former Gov. Parris Glendening blocked development, the former Deep Creek airport sat untouched for over a decade thanks to shrinking budgets and a critical wetland habitat the county seemed to not know how to best use.     The 477-acre peninsula bordering Chesapeake Bay, Deep Creek and Flag Pond represents a large swath of potential public water access.