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U.S. Powerboat Show back to its former glory

The United States Powerboat Show is back. Not that it went anywhere or skipped a year. It’s been an October happening at the Annapolis City waterfront for the last 42 years. For year 43, it returns with its former size and glory.

Great Schooner Race, Volvo Ocean Race set sail

Sailboats, it’s arguable, were the first technological wonder to shrink the wide world to a global village. They’re still doing it. As the U.S. Sailboat Show ended its 45th encampment in Annapolis, two great openwater races demonstrate the lasting power of wind and maritime ingenuity.

Good neighbor provides trailside rest area

Get off your feet — or seat — at the new Allan and Edie Segree Rest Area behind the Broadneck Library on the Broadneck Trail. The 1.2-mile Broadneck Trail, running parallel to busy College Parkway, is a favorite path for bicyclists, joggers and walkers. Opened in 2013, it will connect with the B&A Trail eventually.     As well as a welcoming bench, the Segree Rest Area includes a picnic table, bike rack plus a water fountain for people and a hose for a pet dish, all on pavers and landscaping.

Wooden boats require constant maintenance, and for the Mary Lois, it’s a family affair

Even a landlubber could tell this boat was different. Sitting on the hard at Herrington Harbour North this spring, it turned heads. It was old, it was wood — and something more. The lineage that defined that something more would stump even a sailing expert.     For more than 60 years, this custom-designed and home-built wooden boat, the Mary Lois by name, has sailed the Bay, owned by the same family who designed and built it. The Egelis are a dynasty of world-famous painters who planted their roots in Maryland almost 100 years ago.

This year’s U.S. Sailboat Show has something for you

The newest thing about this year’s United States Sailboat Show is innovative, but not exactly new.     For the first time in its 45-year history, the annual Annapolis sailing extravaganza will debut Brokerage Cove, a section of previously owned yachts for sale. Offering a used-boat option was such a success in its debut at last year’s U.S. Powerboat Show that organizers expanded it to the sailboat show as well.

The drama of big-boat sailing scaled affordably

Some Bay-area sailors own their own yachts and race in spirited regattas, all without spending thousands of dollars — or even getting wet.     Model yacht clubs offer the drama of big-boat sailing on a much smaller, more affordable scale. Enthusiasts take small-scale sailing quite seriously and hold competitive regattas.

Construction begins after two years of environmental review and protests

Eight days after federal regulators gave the go-ahead, Dominion Resources began construction on the controversial $3.8 billion expansion of its liquefied natural gas terminal in southern Calvert County.     “We’re starting construction on our off-site pier. That’s the first step,” Karl Neddenien, spokesman for Dominion Cove Point LNG, told Bay Weekly.

Jump right in at Calvert Marine Museum

Visit Calvert Marine Museum starting October 11 and you’ll see all the way from the heights of the sky to the sheltering shallows to the dark depths. You’ll see life beneath the surface. You’ll see octopoid special effects that outsmart CGI animation, part of the ordinary antics of 150 species in the greater Chesapeake community.     What you won’t see is how this miracle of 21st century estuarine immersion came to be.

Meet the other Bernie Fowler

Five years ago, you knew Bernie Fowler Jr. as the son of a famous father and, maybe, a Southern Maryland building contractor. Today, the Patuxent River champion’s son is recognized as the leader of Farming 4 Hunger. His inspiration, innovation and success have fought hunger with over two million pounds of fresh food for two years. This year, Farming 4 Hunger is well on its way to topping a million pounds of fresh vegetables — primarily corn, potatoes and green beans. Man Meets Mission

Unearthing a forgotten past

At Serenity Farm in Benedict, you’ll find 100 acres devoted to Farming 4 Hunger (see this week’s feature story). It’s also a place for farm tours and events, hayrides and petting zoo, shearing sheep and tobacco barns.     Maryland’s history is rooted there, too.     The recently discovered Burial Ground at Serenity Farm unlocks secrets and pieces together from crumbling bones lives lost in the past.