view counter

News

Black on the Shore in the early 20th century, as painted by Ruth Starr Rose

On Maryland’s Eastern Shore, Ruth Starr Rose believed she had been “suddenly transplanted into a fairy world.”     After Wisconsin, rural Talbot County under the dominating influence of Chesapeake Bay must have been quite the surprise. Certainly her mother was taken aback by their new home, Hope House, a run-down Georgian mansion and tobacco plantation that had belonged to General George Washington’s aide de camp Tench Tilghman. She had gotten nothing much more than a view, a stairway and a cemetery, Ida Starr lamented upon their arrival.

African American Waterman Eldridge Meredith

Captain Eldridge Meredith is the newest Admiral of the Chesapeake. The 90-year-old waterman was awarded Maryland’s highest environmental honor by Gov. Larry Hogan in recognition of his lifetime’s dedication to the Bay.

Start at the beginning as you would for American ancestors of any race

You’d expect Chris Haley, director of the Maryland State Archive’s Study of Slavery, to be hooked on genealogy. He is. Nephew of Roots author Alex Haley, Chris has studied the subject from the ground up. Here he shares some tips for learning about African American ancestors.

It takes mental agility to compete at MathCounts

Can you answer these questions?     The sum of the digits of 2017 is 10. What is the next year this will occur?     The number 2017 is prime. What was the most recent year before 2017 that was also a prime number?     If the NCAA 64-team tournament bracket consists of four regions, and the winner of each region will be part of the Final Four or semifinals of the tournament, how many possible Final Four team combinations are there?

Great-great-grandfather Samuel Barr’s graceful cursive seems in itself an art of love

Editor’s preface: If you do not burn your love letters, they may outlive you. Because contributing writer Diana Dinsick’s great-great-grandmother did not heed that caution, the romantic passion of her husband-to-be lived on for 200 years, finally becoming a love story for you to share.

Tips from a local romance novelist

When Cupid flings his arrows next week, will love be in the cards for you? It can be, if you make his arrows your pen and write your own love story.     Romance novels are hugely popular, according to the Romance Writers of America Association. Certainly for self-publishers that’s true, as 40 percent of the e-book market share on Amazon is romances. Among mass-market paperbacks, romances are top earners.

Growing industry needs more workers

Recreational boating in Maryland is a $2.4 billion industry looking for new employees to meet the demand.     From as young as 11 to adults, girls and boys, men and women of all educational levels, including college grads, need to look no further for a potential job or career opportunity than on and around the waters of Maryland. And no farther than the 7th Annual Marine and Maritime Career Fair on February 25.

From one waterfront restaurant comes another

“We’re always looking ahead and exploring new restaurant ideas and locations,” Julia Jones, owner of The Point Crab House and Grill in Arnold, told Bay Weekly last August.     Now Jones and her partner-husband Bobby have found the spot.     The pair who created a million-dollar waterfront destination on Mill Creek off the Magothy River are expanding to Herring Bay.     Ketch 22 will open at Herrington Harbour South Marina Resort by summer. A complete remodel is underway.

Oystering takes muscle, hope and political savvy

It’s still dark when I park my car at the public boat ramp in Solomons where I am to meet Ryan Mould, who drives 46 miles from Shady Side each weekday to oyster on a public bar below the Solomons Island bridge. As I walk out on the pier, the lights of four or five boats are hovering over the oyster bars, drifting slowly. At 7:05am I see the lights of Aquaholic approaching the pier to pick me up. Like all the others oystering this day all over the Bay, Ryan and his mate, Mike, will start at daylight, 7:21am.

Building an edible forest that mimics nature and may even fix environmental damage

An edible forest sounds like something out of Willy Wonka. Ripening pears and bright berries drip from trees. Branches brim with cherries, blackberries and blueberries.     The food forest is an idea ripe for the picking. It’s an idea Birgit Sharp, of Fairhaven, is already planting.