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History & Lore

Young Maryland voter maps women’s campaign to vote
       SUFFRAGE — In representative government, the right to vote in electing public officials and adopting or rejecting proposed legislation.           In the year 2019, presidential hopefuls — including five women so far — are lining up like beauty pageant contestants to win our attention and perhaps our vote.

Two determined locals brought to town “someone out of the pages of history”

      In 1984, Rosa Parks came to Annapolis. It almost didn’t happen. Two of the people who pulled it together took different paths to overcoming obstacles. Paula Phillips was realistic. Carl Snowden was idealistic. Both were determined.

Retired professor follows Maryland hero from Port Tobacco to Canada

        Uncle Tom lived many lives.            To the thousands of mid-19th-century readers of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s best-selling novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, he was a heroic slave, his cabin home was heralded as a symbol of self-sacrifice. Yet to 20th century black Americans, his name lived as a symbol of subservience.

Statues of Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass to stand in Maryland State House

      The intersection of public art and politics is a hard one to negotiate. Lots of traffic — history, symbolism, myth, ideals, politics and budgets — is moving in different directions.

Calvert Library writes local history

       In Calvert County, the public library has gone beyond collecting books to creating them. For Women’s History Month last March, the library sponsored Inspiring Black Women of Calvert County. This year men take the stage as subjects of a new local history book, Inspiring African American Men of Calvert County.
Sotterley Plantation memorialized as UNESCO Slave Route Project Site
for role in Middle Passage 
       Historic Sotterley Plantation, along the Patuxent River in Southern Maryland is the 94-acre site of bountiful colonial revival gardens, music and wine festivals, picturesque weddings, an organic farm, special events and of course, tours of the historic 18th-cen­tury manor house and grounds.
Methuselah and Mary Pumphrey lived history
       Methuselah Pumphrey lived to be 96, writing along the way another chapter in Chesapeake Country’s African American history. The history he made was not earth-shattering. He didn’t walk to the North Pole, like Marylander Matthew Henson, or gain equal pay for Maryland black teachers and then desegregate the nation’s schools like Thurgood Marshall.        Pumphrey’s was the kind of life most of us live: infinitely precious on a small scale.

Discovering the place and the truth behind the legend

      From 19th century art to 20th century children’s books to the Disney animated movie to the sultry song Fever, the forbidden love story of Pocahantas and John Smith is embedded in American romantic legend.        The narrative changes depending on who is telling it: Europeans or Native Americans. For the real story is very different from the myth.

2019 love stories get no help from SweetHearts

       Valentine’s Day is estimated to generate more than $1.8 billion in candy sales. Most popular of those candies are conversation hearts, the little hearts with cute sayings on them: Be Mine, Marry Me. Even heart-shaped boxes of chocolates were overtaken by the little sugar hearts.          Now SweetHearts, the most popular brand of the most popular Valentine’s candy, are no longer being made.

Conservation groups combine powers

      Just two weeks after the South River Federation and the West/Rhode Riverkeeper began their unified partnership as the Arundel Rivers Federation, two more regional watershed groups have tied the knot.          The Severn River Association and the Back Creek Conservancy have merged their operations into one watershed organization. Both will operate under the Severn River Association masthead.