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History & Lore

Honoring our fallen heroes

Memorial Day gets due honor at Chesapeake Beach. The annual Stars & Stripes Festival, now in its fifth year, remembers the soldiers and sailors, Marines and fliers who have given their lives defending the United States of America.     “The meaning of the day was becoming lost,” said Connie O’Dell, who manages special events for the Calvert County town.

Chesapeake Curiosities

What are the dilapidated buildings in the woods near Beverly-Triton Beach at the end of the Mayo Peninsula?     Most likely, they are the remains of picnic pavilions at the popular beach complex and tourist attraction.

Since 1946, these Navy fliers have been delighting audiences with their aerial feats

On May 24, 25 and 27 the Blue Angels return to Annapolis for Commissioning Week at the United States Naval Academy.     Since 1946, the Blue Angels have been delighting audiences with their stunning and death-defying flight demonstrations and aerial feats. Here’s how their 70-year history began.

Whence such a name?

What happened across the Bay at Kent Island to give Bloody Point and the Bloody Point Lighthouse that chilling name?     Nobody knows — for certain.     How’s that?     “Many of the names of locations have been lost over time due to the fact that ownership changes hands,” explains Maya Davis of the Maryland State Archives. “Often time new owners change the name of the property.”

Goshen Farm, powered by grassroots

“The grassroots is the source of power. With it you can do anything,” wrote Earth Day founder Gaylord Nelson of the wattage behind his bright idea.     Is it shining still?     Take an Earth Day No. 47 visit to Goshen Farm, and you’ll see the light.     From the grassroots, a community rose to save the last Colonial-era farm on the Broadneck Peninsula. Its work has created a hidden oasis of 22 undeveloped acres, surrounded by Cape St. Claire and Walnut Ridge on the Broadneck Peninsula.

Why did a paper on the ins and outs of Chesapeake Country choose Earth Day as its birthday?     In 1993, in the first issue of the paper (born as New Bay Times), an editorial that served as a welcome letter and introduction explained that the new paper would focus on the environmental issues facing the area and also celebrate and explore the unique ecosystem and region that we are lucky to call home.

Why all the dilapidated barns around Southern Maryland?

Tobacco barns were good at drying tobacco; not so good at other jobs.     Since the Colonial era, the Atlantic coast from Maryland to Georgia all the way inland to Kentucky was known for sweet tobacco. The key cash crop for generations of local farmers, it was cultivated until the early 2000s when Maryland’s Tobacco Buyout, funded through the national 1998 Master Settlement Agreement, pretty much ended tobacco farming and encouraged other crops.

What’s with State and Church Circles?

Annapolis has a really strange layout. Is it on purpose or due to hundreds of years of use and expansion? Church and State Circles are close together by design. Their proximity serves as an illustration that church and state were linked in Colonial times.

Galesville’s Hot Sox field

Stand at home plate, close your eyes, tilt your head just right and you can hear the whoosh of a fast ball, the sharp crack of a wooden bat connecting for a line drive down centerfield and the echoes of cheering fans.

At Calvert Library Prince Frederick

After throwing off the shackles of slavery, many blacks in Maryland continued to struggle to meet the most basic needs. The changing face of America meant learning to rely on each other and not the master of a plantation farm. Because of this need, benevolent organizations, or secret societies, were formed.