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History & Lore

At home or on the town

      St. Patrick’s Day, celebrated on March 17, is the anniversary of the death of the patron saint of Ireland. Kidnapped as a teen, Saint Patrick was brought to Ireland but eventually escaped to his native Britain. He later returned to Ireland and is credited with bringing Christianity to the Irish. He died in the fifth century. But on March 17, at least in America, everybody is Irish. Indeed, more than 30 million Americans have predominantly Irish roots. Between 1820 and 1930, 4.5 million Irish arrived in America.

Giant Atlantic sturgeon spotting hopeful signs

      A sturgeon is not a pretty fish. It’s long and bony with a sharp, upturned snout and whiskers. A prehistoric fish, they have been around for more than 100 million years. Once, Atlantic sturgeon were common in Chesapeake Bay and its rivers, the biggest fish that swam here in modern times.
How giant sharks’ teeth became ‘ultimate cutting tools’
      A new study based on sharks’ teeth found in Calvert County concludes that the teeth of megalodon, the largest shark in history, evolved over millions of years to a knife-like shape perfect for killing and eating whales and dolphins.

Archaeology and photography combine to ­dramatic effect

     Archaeologists throughout the Chesapeake are in a race against time to record sites threatened by the effects of climate change.     Rising sea levels, eroding coasts and intense storms have washed away countless resources, some dating back thousands of years. Sinking land and rampant development have exacerbated the problem.­
Young Maryland voter maps women’s campaign to vote
       SUFFRAGE — In representative government, the right to vote in electing public officials and adopting or rejecting proposed legislation.           In the year 2019, presidential hopefuls — including five women so far — are lining up like beauty pageant contestants to win our attention and perhaps our vote.

Two determined locals brought to town “someone out of the pages of history”

      In 1984, Rosa Parks came to Annapolis. It almost didn’t happen. Two of the people who pulled it together took different paths to overcoming obstacles. Paula Phillips was realistic. Carl Snowden was idealistic. Both were determined.

Retired professor follows Maryland hero from Port Tobacco to Canada

        Uncle Tom lived many lives.            To the thousands of mid-19th-century readers of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s best-selling novel Uncle Tom’s Cabin, he was a heroic slave, his cabin home was heralded as a symbol of self-sacrifice. Yet to 20th century black Americans, his name lived as a symbol of subservience.

Statues of Harriet Tubman and Frederick Douglass to stand in Maryland State House

      The intersection of public art and politics is a hard one to negotiate. Lots of traffic — history, symbolism, myth, ideals, politics and budgets — is moving in different directions.

Calvert Library writes local history

       In Calvert County, the public library has gone beyond collecting books to creating them. For Women’s History Month last March, the library sponsored Inspiring Black Women of Calvert County. This year men take the stage as subjects of a new local history book, Inspiring African American Men of Calvert County.
Sotterley Plantation memorialized as UNESCO Slave Route Project Site
for role in Middle Passage 
       Historic Sotterley Plantation, along the Patuxent River in Southern Maryland is the 94-acre site of bountiful colonial revival gardens, music and wine festivals, picturesque weddings, an organic farm, special events and of course, tours of the historic 18th-cen­tury manor house and grounds.