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History & Lore

After more than a century in the water, keeping Thomas Point alive is no easy task 

 

      As Thomas Point Shoal Lighthouse loomed ever closer in the brackish waters of Chesapeake Bay, John Potvin placed one leg on the edge of Audacious, a pristine white deadrise.      The fishing boat’s engine roared and sputtered as it neared the historic landmark: a towering, red-and-white circular house squating on crisscrossed metal beams. 
  Humans aren’t the only mammals swimming in the summer Bay. Dolphins are making regular visits, too.       From April to September, these sleek swimmers are being spotted from Virginia’s Northern Neck into the Potomac River and up all the way to the Inner Harbor of Baltimore.

Sanctuary for the largest collection of ­shipwrecks in the western hemisphere

      The Ghost Fleet of Mallows Bay is now moving full steam ahead toward becoming the nation’s newest national marine sanctuary.      Almost five years ago, Maryland and Charles County nominated the unique area as a sanctuary. The title provides prestige and national recognition as well as federal technical and financial assistance for preservation, science, education and interpretation. 

Film captures the last generation of Maryland’s African American Farmers

 

      In Calvert County, the last of the African American farmers in Maryland toil night and day, tending to their livestock and remaining acres of crops.       At its peak, the population of African American farmers was at 1 million, whom in total owned 16 million acres. Today, there are 18,000 black farmers left in America, who own not even one percent of the farmland in the U.S.

For the 32nd straight year, Fowler will lead friends and family into the Patuxent to make a point. For the first time, Betty Fowler won’t be with him.

 

      When 95-year-old Bernie Fowler leads people into the Patuxent River on Sunday, the river in his heart will be one neither you nor I can imagine.      For the chain of followers linked arm in arm with the river champion in the annual test of water clarity, statistics tell the story of the river’s woes or redemption. Can the put-upon river with its D-grade report card achieve its Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan targets for 2025?

Overall health still improving

 

     We’re getting our homework done despite Mother Nature’s agenda. So says the recently released 2018 Chesapeake Bay Report Card issued by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.      The Chesapeake Bay score remains a C, though it decreased from 54 percent to 46 percent.

It’s all counted in Chesapeake Bay Coastal Inventory

 

      “To keep every cog and wheel is the first precaution of intelligent tinkering,” conservationist Aldo Leopold’s advised.      In applying that precaution to Chesapeake Bay, the Virginia Institute of Marine Sciences has inventoried 60 million linear feet of tidal shoreline. Bay waters meet almost 7,500 miles of land in Virginia and 4,000 in Maryland.

Experience the culture’s diversity at this annual festival 

 

      At the Annapolis Greek Festival, something magical happens. You become Greek for a day.      Hosted by the Saints Constantine & Helen Greek Orthodox Church on Riva Road from Thursday, May 30 to the following Sunday, the festival thrusts you into a makeshift Greek homeland. In this land, you’ll find more than 30 Greek foods and dishes, as well as four dance groups, two bands and vendors selling unique arts and crafts.

You won’t want to miss the ­Southern Maryland Celtic Festival

     Like the village that rises out of the mists in Scotland every hundred years in the 1954 movie Brigadoon, a park in St. Leonard comes alive with the sounds, smells and sights of the oldest Celtic celebration in Maryland.        But for just one day.       On that single day, Saturday, April 27, the annual Southern Maryland Celtic Festival at Jefferson Patterson Park resounds with bagpipes, drums, fiddles and celebration.

He’ll always remind me of when …

      When I heard that my old friend Mike Busch passed away the day before the General Assembly ended, I thought of my mother, who died when she was 94. She and Mike were close — they used to meet and chat in Graul’s most Sundays — and they could both smell BS a mile away. Mom used to say that Mike and my godfather, former Republican governor Ted McKeldin, were the only two politicians she ever trusted. My mother was a very good judge of character.