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History & Lore

Is massive sea creature a Chessie ancestor?

       Researchers in Poland recently announced discovery of what’s left of a pliosaur, a fierce predator that patrolled the oceans 150 million years ago, in the Jurassic period.          Paleontologists working a cornfield in the Holly Cross Mountains in central Poland also found bones from a second ocean creature, this one with a long neck, as well as bones of ancient turtles and fossilized teeth three inches wide. They described their findings in the Proceedings of the Geologists’ Association.
A Bay Weekly conversation with Allison Tracy of Smithsonian ­Environmental Research Center
     Oysters are a victim in the climate crisis, by most accounts, and ours in Chesapeake Bay waters are feeling it like their bivalve brethren elsewhere.      West Coast oysters are hurting from changing ocean chemistry. In New Orleans’ French Quarter, eateries are scrambling to live up to their reputations as Gulf of Mexico oysters die, smothered by the billions of gallons of Midwestern freshwater rolling down the Mississippi River.
Tour the county from Hole in the Barn Door to Mariner's Compass
     Calvert County’s mysterious new trail is not hidden, but you need a map or a guide to find and follow its course. Along the trail in plain sight are 17 wooden-framed images each with a design painted in an array of color combinations. Each has its own designation, like, Mariner’s Compass, Sawtooth Star or Farmer’s Daughter. The designs are so different that, despite being mostly fashioned on 8-by-8 or 4-by-4-foot frames, they don’t seem to have a central theme. 

If the food is good, most anything else can be forgiven

     The holiday commemorating the first communal meal with native Americans and the early colonists now brings families together to enjoy a feast. I strive to gather our Thanksgiving meal from our garden and to include free-range poultry. I also like to use ingredients and recipes that our foremothers and fathers would have used.      On this holiday for memories, many rise from the creation of the annual feast. Catastrophes in their time are now family legend.

At 99 years, he’s made more history than he can remember

      It’s another gathering of the family to whom Emil Saroch has devoted his life since the death of his wife Patricia on Christmas Day 2004.       They seem to get larger every year. It started with him and his wife. Then the four kids came, then their spouses, then eight grandkids and two great-grandkids over the years. Many midshipmen, as well, have found the Sarochs’ home a welcome port and respite during breaks from the rigorous regimen at school at the Naval Academy.

Bayside History Museum keeps up the tradition

      Tom Crockett’s toy train display at Tan’s Cycles was a holiday hit for 17 years. From Christmas trains running every December, he expanded to include Halloween trains in October and November. Crowds of children with their parents and grandparents poured into his shop to watch the trains speed past mountains, towns and itty-bitty people.

A true story

    I don’t need psychics to convince me that ghosts are real.     My own ghost supplies all the proof I need.

City Dock named UNESCO Slave Route Site

      Finding a way to acknowledge the bitter legacy of slavery has been a challenge for historic sites across the country. Helping give voice to the stories of the enslaved are historic markers, memorials and commemorations.          Annapolis, which just unveiled an historical lynching marker on Calvert Street, is also now designated as a Site of Memory associated with the UNESCO Slave Route Project by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization.
Over all the changes, the ­wonder remains
      As we get older, we pass many milestones: a decade since college graduation, 25-year school reunions, silver anniversaries and half-century birthdays. I have spent 50 years power boating and sailing on Chesapeake Bay. Fifty years! Two-thirds of my lifetime on the waters of the Bay. Fifty years filled with wonderful memories of marvelous, exciting and sometimes awesome weekends and vacations on the water.

Vanishing islands to be restored from Baltimore Harbor dredging

      Since Bay Weekly was young in the 1990s, we have watched as fast-disappearing Poplar Island, a getaway for Franklin Roosevelt, was rebuilt with the dredge spoils form Baltimore Harbor. Over the years, 34 million cubic yards of materials from the harbor bottoms have dramatically expanded the landmass off Tilghman Island, and we’re told now that the project is about done.