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Green Living

Turning a crab feast into an eco-success

       Twenty-two hundred crab-lovers filled their bellies with crabs, barbecue, beer and watermelon at the 74th Annapolis Rotary Crab Feast earlier this month.             Trash cans were filled as well, with shells, claws, cups and plates. Instead of the landfill, all that waste is going to recycling.

Kids On the Creek get to know the water

      Visit Truxton Park in Annapolis Saturday, August 24, with your kids and they’ll learn who’s swimming in Spa Creek. Biologists will identify the fish you pull up in seines. They’ll also hear about the 12 types of animals that make the park home and enjoy a scavenger hunt with prizes.             Experienced captains are standing by to take kids out on the water. Or you might try out paddleboards.

Potomac gives up 376,933 pounds

 

     Giant tires, propane gas tanks and shopping carts bogged down with mud.     Trash-picking volunteers found this trash and more in the littered waters of the Potomac River at the 31st annual Watershed Cleanup. The Alice Ferguson Foundation initiative sent out 9,745 volunteers between mid-March and late-May. They scooped 376,933 pounds of trash into garbage bags.

They’ll create school monarch gardens 

    Deep in the woods of Millersville, 10 volunteers surrounded a sprawling, lush-green monarch garden. Insect life teemed among towering milkweed plants. A black swallowtail butterfly fluttered down, landing atop a green milkweed to spread its wings.     The disparate 10 had gathered to learn how to grow monarch gardens at local elementary schools.

47-inch visibility is half-century record

 

     “It was a wonderful day,” said 95-year-old Bernie Fowler of the most challenging Wade-In of his 32 years testing the water clarity of the Patuxent River. A nor’easter had set in with light rain, fog, 90 percent humidity and wind up to 20mph.

Back Creek living shoreline credited with clarity

 

     Volunteers with Spa Creek Conservancy and Back Creek Conservancy followed in Bernie Fowler’s footsteps on June’s second Sunday, wading into Annapolis area creeks to check clarity in four locations.

For the 32nd straight year, Fowler will lead friends and family into the Patuxent to make a point. For the first time, Betty Fowler won’t be with him.

 

      When 95-year-old Bernie Fowler leads people into the Patuxent River on Sunday, the river in his heart will be one neither you nor I can imagine.      For the chain of followers linked arm in arm with the river champion in the annual test of water clarity, statistics tell the story of the river’s woes or redemption. Can the put-upon river with its D-grade report card achieve its Chesapeake Bay Watershed Implementation Plan targets for 2025?

SOFO mobilizes community to rejuvenate ­Forest Drive eyesore

 

     The 504-foot fence lining Annapolis Middle School is looking better all the time.      The once-faded, rusty-brown, chain-link fence spiked with barbed wire is now glowing night-black.       Three large painted metal crabs decorate the sections nearest the school. Colored ribbons twirl around the crabs in a rippling rainbow.

Patuxent River Park 150 trash bags cleaner

A lot of tires, a large fuel tank, baseballs and footballs plus plenty of bottles and plastic and Styrofoam containers. That kind of junk made up much of the 150 bags of trash found and removed from Patuxent River Park near Upper Marlboro by 50 volunteers and 10 staffers.

Overall health still improving

 

     We’re getting our homework done despite Mother Nature’s agenda. So says the recently released 2018 Chesapeake Bay Report Card issued by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science.      The Chesapeake Bay score remains a C, though it decreased from 54 percent to 46 percent.