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Boating

Dee of St. Mary’s is your one chance on the Western Shore

Shanghaied into labor, two able-bodied passengers grapple a stout line hand over hand to hoist the 2,000-square-foot Dacron mainsail of the skipjack Dee of St. Mary’s up her 72-foot tree-trunk mast. Then First Mate John Fulchiron crawls out on the 19-foot bowsprit to raise the smaller jib. And off Dee goes.

Six destinations to remind you we are not meant to live on land alone

These are six of 99 stops in Simarski and husband Guy Guthridge’s six-year voyage of Chesapeake discovery aboard Bright Pleiades. Other journeys appeared in Bay Weekly between 2007 and 2008 under the title Voyages of Discovery.  

Along the Chesapeake, a fellow they call Bunny stays busy as a rabbit

The stately, down-on-its-luck vessel of vintage stock is badly in need of Bunny.     Like people, every boat has its story. The plight of this ’41 Chris Craft Sedan Cruiser begins when its owner dies “down South somewhere.”     She’s cast out of her covered shed, homeless. Somebody with an eye for elegant lines takes pity.

Tips before you buy

1.    Buy a boat that matches your intended use. 2.    If you are trailing, make sure your vehicle can pull the weight of the boat and trailer. 3.    Buy from a dealer who will educate you on all the systems on the boat. 4.    Test the line of vision from the helm to make sure you have clear visibility. 5.    Check various compartments to see how accessible maintenance will be.

This $6 million, custom-built ­vessel from Anne Arundel ­County soon could be dodging pirates in search of giant marlin

We should hope that Mantra, the 88-foot sportfishing yacht from Weaver Boatworks, about to depart Tracy’s Landing for some of the world’s most dangerous waters, avoids the perils of the last Mantra.

For some boaters, jetties are Scylla and Charybdis

Two jetties protect the Deale harbor in Southern Anne Arundel County.     Neither is new. Yet 900-foot jetties are  bad news to a few of the thousands of boaters entering Rockhold Creek.     Saturday, August 18, What’s Next rocketed up onto a jetty.     “This one must have gone quite a way up and turned since the stern is on the jetty and the bow is in the water,” said Doug Roberts of Deale.

After almost a year at sea and nearly 40,000 miles, the Volvo Race is a true endurance test

The 39,270-mile Volvo Ocean Race is the greatest test of human endurance in the guise of sport on the planet earth. It’s life at the extreme with its own curiosities.     Starting the nine-month race in Spain is always fun. The Spanish know how to throw a good party, and the royalty-crowned pomp and circumstance befits such an epic voyage.
In this final leg, the Volvo Ocean Racers come full circle to Galway, Ireland
 

Leg 8 of the Volvo Ocean Race

When we last reported on The Volvo Ocean Race, 12 days of intense racing across the Atlantic from Miami had ended in one of Volvo’s closest finishes. Despite reaching Lisbon second by six minutes, Groupama gained the overall lead.

Tropical Storm Alberto and pressure fronts low and high make for trouble on Leg 7 of The Volvo Ocean Race

When we last checked on The Volvo Ocean Race, the sailors had ridden the Caribbean current and safely crossed the Bermuda Triangle, reaching Miami in 17 days. In fluky, dying-wind conditions just off shore of glittering South Beach, Ian Walker and the crafty vets aboard Abu Dhabi once again showed their mastery of short-handed, close-track, in-port sailing by battling Groupama neck-and-neck the entire in-port race. PUMA stole third from Camper in a photo finish.