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Boating

A firsthand account from the Volvo Ocean Racers

After sailing the earth’s five major oceans, the Volvo Ocean Race sailors have delivered their verdict when it comes to pollution. Humans are using the oceans of the world as a dumping ground for everything from plastics to chemicals to human waste.     Every four years, when the Volvo veterans sail the world anew, it gets worse. Much worse.

Tactician Terry Hutchinson rises to top spot for a second time

Terry Hutchinson has been named the U.S. Sailing Association’s 2014 Rolex Yachtsman of the year.     A veteran of four America’s Cup campaigns, Hutchinson in 2014 was atop more major regatta leader boards than any other American sailor. Competing as chief tactician, he won the Farr 40 and TP52 World Championships and the Oman Cup’s RC44 one-design class, among other big-boat regattas around the world. He also was at the helm in the Annapolis Fall Brawl, as the winner in the J/70 class.

Can’t get your boat to a pump-out station? One will come to you

If you spend much time on your boat, it’s probably got a head. What you put into the head can’t go into the Bay. It’s against the law to pump effluent into the Bay or its tributaries or within three miles of the U.S. coastline.

Hidden Harbour Marina honored as Clean Marina of the Year

Chesapeake Country has hundreds of marinas, each unique in its own way. They come in different sizes, different locations, different facilities — and different levels of cleanliness and Bay friendliness.

That’s the story of Volvo’s 7,200-mile Leg 5

Imagine this scene …    

You’re not the only Aquaholic on the water

Is your boat in the Sophia, Mason, Ethan or Ava class of popularity?     It is, according to the The ­BoatUS 2015 list of Top Ten Boat Names, if you’ve christened it ­Serenity, Seas the Day, Andiamo (Italian for let’s go), Aquaholic, ­Second Wind, Island Time, Happy Ours, Journey, Serendipity or ­Relentless.     Sound familiar?     If so, your dog is likely named Max or Bella.

“We want Annapolis to be known as the best city for sailing in the world.”

The National Sailing Hall of Fame is finally set to launch its next phase, thanks to a $250,000 donation from the Merrill Family Foundation, run by the three children of the late Capital and Washingtonian publisher Philip Merrill.     “This comes from two things: our love of sailing and our love of Annapolis,” Cathy Merrill Williams said.     “We want Annapolis to be known as the best city for sailing in the world,” she said.

Sailors ­battle winter monsoons and South Pacific trade winds in Leg 4 of the Volvo Ocean Race

When Joni Mitchell wrote the curious lyric, But clouds got in my way in her haunting melody “Both Sides Now,” she could have been talking about the Volvo Ocean Race. From Spain to Capetown … Capetown to Abu Dhabi … Abu Dhabi to Sanya … then the 5,264 nautical mile Leg 4 challenge from China to New Zealand, the race has been an endless struggle to navigate around and through the clouds.     The oceans make the weather on the planet earth, and clouds are born in that nursery. So are the winds.

For Leg 3 of the Volvo Ocean Race, navigators had to break the 4,500-nautical-mile run into manageable pieces

Before leaving the dock, Brunel navigator Andrew Cape christened the 4,642-mile third leg of the Volvo Ocean Race, from Abu Dhabi to Sanya, China, the “s••••y leg.”     “We will encounter a lot of fishing boats,” he wrote. “Everywhere along the coast of India, Vietnam and Malaysia there are fishing nets and lines in which we can become snared.”

Volvo Ocean Racers hang on as one boat goes down in Leg 2

Leg 2 of the Volvo Ocean Race, a 6,125-mile slog from South Africa to Abu Dhabi, was a treacherous sail. The fleet of seven boats left Cape Town with Table Mountain wrapped in a fog hat and 40-knot winds creating utter chaos.     “That start was some of the ­hairiest sailing we’ve seen,” wrote Abu Dhabi Ocean Racing’s Matt Knighton.