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Bay Weekly Interviews

A Bay Weekly conversation with ­Vinnie Bevivino, the ­mastermind of ­Chesapeake Compost Works

Give me your trash! says Vinnie Bevivino, the mastermind of Chesapeake Compost Works, of the organic and biodegradable material taking up 20 to 30 percent of all landfills.     Chesapeake Compost Works — begun in 2010 as a 40-page business plan and a drawing — has risen as a 55,000-square-foot warehouse in Baltimore’s Curtis Bay. At full capacity by year’s end, 60 tons of compost will be cured there every day.

Former Governor Parris Glendening discusses Smart Growth, long hair and tweeners in stretch limousines

How is life different after politics?     I used to get a haircut every two weeks because I was so often on camera, which exaggerated the slightest curl. Now I get one every five or six weeks. One of the percs of not being in office.

Farr Yacht Design’s Patrick Shaughnessy on creating the boats that sail round the world

Sailing legend Bruce Farr’s career began long ago and far away in his hometown of Auckland, New Zealand. By the 1970s, Farr — then in his 20s — had established a reputation for designing fast, cheap boats that were easier to build and sail than most of the competition. His designs won one-quarter, one-half, three-quarter and one-ton world championships.

After competing in the Paralympics, Annapolitan Clark Rachfal is eager to see where else tandem cycling takes him

Paralympian Clark Rachfal came home to Annapolis from the London Paralympic Games Sunday, September 15.     Rachfal, 29, was diagnosed with Leber’s congenital amaurosis when he was four. The degenerative eye disease has slowly taken his sight, leaving only fuzzy outlines on his periphery.     “I can see less than I saw yesterday, and more than tomorrow,” he says.

Hard Traveler Kenn Roberts on making — and giving away — millions

Bay Weekly: The Hard Travelers are in their second life. How is this one different? Kenn Roberts: Buddy Renfro and I had been listening to the Kingston Trio when we started the Hard Travelers in 1958 in the basement of the Phi Delt house at the University of Maryland. We were young guys grasping for notoriety and a career in music.     Now nobody’s looking to get discovered. It’s all about playing this original music for people and using that to raise money for charity.

Delegate Bob Costa and his deciding vote for the Civil Marriage Protection Act ... A Bay Weekly Conversation

At first glance, it seems unlikely that a truck-loving, firefighting Republican from rural Anne Arundel County would give the Civil Marriage Protection Act its victory vote, moving same-sex marriage through the House of Delegates and a step closer to law in Maryland.     Del. Bob Costa goes by the email handle truckkie and drives one of Anne Arundel County’s biggest fire trucks out of the Lothian fire station.

Tim O’Neill talks with Bay Weekly about the restoration of Annapolis’ Capitol dome

Tim O’Neill of Severna Park is project manager for Power Component Systems out of Hanover. One of several subcontractors restoring the dome of Maryland’s State House — built between 1784 and 1787 as the second dome to top the 1772 Capitol — Power Component Systems has the job of stripping the top layers of paint from the Capitol’s dome. Bay Weekly    What’s it like up there?

A Bay Weekly conversation with David Humphreys, director of the Annapolis Regional Transportation Management Association

On your seventh circle through the auto hell of Historic Annapolis in fruitless search of a parking place, you take traffic personally. Personally is how you take the blockage on Rt. 50 west, gridlock on the Bay Bridge — and your own personal traffic hell, wherever you find it.

A Bay Weekly conversation with Kenneth Reckhow

No less an authoritative body than the National Research Council weighed in this month on progress in restoring Chesapeake Bay. In a hefty report, the council, which is part of the National Academies of Science, delivered a sobering assessment of what would be required to achieve ambitious goals.