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Your paper is hand-delivered each week by a team of dedicated drivers

All the wonderful writing, beautiful cover pages, pleasing layouts and on-time printing wouldn’t mean a thing without the group of six stalwart delivery drivers who get Bay Weekly to your favorite pick-up point each Thursday. Neither rain, nor snow, nor wind, nor blinding early morning sunshine will keep these mighty drivers from their appointed rounds.     You may never see them, so we bring them to you, in celebration of all the drivers who — with this paper — will have delivered 1,219 editions of Bay Weekly over 24 years.

Father George Asigre explains the significance of the holiest of ­Christian holidays

For every Christian church, the six weeks of Lent are a time of preparation. On Easter morning, worshippers arrive at a church burst out in celebration. Bay Weekly You’re celebrating your first Easter at Severna Park’s St. John the Evangelist Catholic Parish …

Create Easter masterpieces the way my Polish grandmother did

My Polish grandmother who came to America as a young teenager brought with her an old tradition that my family still enjoys: making Polish Easter eggs.     Saturday evening before Easter finds an assortment of family and friends around our table decorating eggs the old-fashioned way, by making designs of melted wax on the eggs and then dipping them in Easter egg dyes. We use the tablets that come with the kits instead of the onionskins that Grandma used for color. The results are original, bright and make a great display for the Easter buffet.

A commuter’s love song

I love the Bay Bridge. Even when I’m in a line of slow-moving homebound traffic, even when I’m behind a carload of Bay-gazing tourists or even when facing winds, rains or snows that challenge the journey, I still love it.

Tips for setting in new places

After 13 settled years, my husband joined the Foreign Service. We packed up our kids and our pets, sold the house and started a life of moving. In 25 years, we traveled to nine posts: the Congo (then called Zaire, which none of our friends had heard of), Morocco, Washington, Paris, back to Washington, Geneva, Moscow, London and finally New York. In five of these postings — Morocco, Washington, Geneva, Moscow and London — I worked as the community liaison officer. One of the privileges of the job was helping employees, and especially their families, adapt to their new home.

Great-great-grandfather Samuel Barr’s graceful cursive seems in itself an art of love

Editor’s preface: If you do not burn your love letters, they may outlive you. Because contributing writer Diana Dinsick’s great-great-grandmother did not heed that caution, the romantic passion of her husband-to-be lived on for 200 years, finally becoming a love story for you to share.

The story here is all about living up to expectations

Once I got married, it seemed as though the children started coming along on a regular basis like the books in the Bible: Matthew, Mark, Luke, Elizabeth, Ester and Ruth. They just kept coming. That’s what good Catholic wives and mothers did back in the day. I learned how to stretch the grocery budget with lots of rice and pasta. Money was always tight, especially at Christmas time.

Where and when to go to catch summer's favorite holiday

Friday July 1 Herrington Harbour Fireworks Fireworks set off from a barge illuminate Herring Bay. Marina grounds are reserved for members. But the view is great from boats, private docks, lawns and beaches. About 9:15pm, Herrington Harbour South, Rose Haven: ­www.herringtonharbour.com. Chesapeake Beach Fireworks

In a three-day Maryland Day Celebration, you can loop back 380 years.

This weekend, you can loop 380 years back in time without breaking stride in history’s forward march.         March 24 is the birthday of Maryland’s modern history. That European encounter opened the door to all of us, native inhabitants excepted.     On that early spring day in 1634, voyagers from the ships the Ark and the Dove prayed on a Potomac River island, thanking God for surviving their long voyage, coming to land safely and negotiating a peace accord with the Piscataway Indians.

My year of reconnections

This wasn’t supposed to be my year of reconnections; it was supposed to be the year of nothing. 2011 had been the year of moving to Annapolis; 2012 the year of my retirement. I assumed I would look back and find the months of 2013 unexciting and unmemorable.     But fate intervened. A series of events turned 2013 into my year of reconnections. I connected with 22 people with whom I had lost contact for anywhere from five to 45 years.