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Your guide to Chesaeake Country's freshest produce and more!

Correspondence

Dear Bay Weekly: After my spring, 2009, internship at Bay Weekly, wanted to update you on my continuing post-retirement quest to keep myself off the streets of Annapolis and out of trouble. After my work as a Legacy Leadership program volunteer through the legislative session with Del. Mary Ann Love, I went back the next year and worked for Mary Christine Jackman, who is the investments manager in the Treasury. This was an extended stay and my responsibility was to reconcile some 14,000 paper records of 1990 and 1991 minibonds against a database.
Dear Bay Weekly: This lipdub, as it’s called, was done by over 400 Emerson College students. Daniel Manning [Bay Weekly 2010 Calverton High School intern] is not a main character, but he managed to be in a fairly visible place, at 2:54. The video was posted on December 9; as of December 11, it had already received almost 46,000 hits. This many hits tells me that this is a new genre that people will copy; you’ve heard it here. The lipdub made me want to go to the school myself, and there was concurrence amongst my colleagues at Calverton.
Dear Bay Weekly: Had to write with kudos on the Season’s Bounty: 41,000 words … Wow! I of course enjoyed Ellen Moyer’s trail article in the same issue, Go Outside and Play [http://bayweekly.com/articles/good-living/article/go-outside-and-play]. –Dave Linthicum, Jug Bay  
Dear Bay Weekly: I pick up Bay Weekly every week, usually at Gary’s Grill, and I love the sudoku puzzle. I try the crossword, too, but I’m better at the sudoku. You haven’t run the answers to the sudoku the past couple weeks. And why don’t you have the answers to the puzzles in that week’s paper instead of the next week? A week is a long time to wait. –Pauline Koch, Severna Park  
Dear Bay Weekly: Right on, Steve Carr [Nov. 24]! I love those little urban and suburban patches of nature. They remind us that nature lives on and is incredibly resilient.

Readers respond to Steve Carr’s Where We Live column of November 24

Dear Bay Weekly: Steve Carr’s article is good as always! Everyone is running around these days seeking Happiness indexes. We should have one for the Bay, and the index/measurement should be on people living today and how they can maintain or improve their level. Total Maximum Daily Loads are nice and necessary, but they are just another diversion that separates people from land and water and have no personal meaning for individuals.

Readers respond to Steve Carr’s Where We Live column of November 24

Dear Bay Weekly: The story is beautiful. I find myself wondering how long my brother and I can hold onto our two vacant lots neither one of us wants to see developed. They are among the last lots in East Pendennis Mount. They make us land poor and may have to one day be sacrificed to pay off our debts or secure some part of our retirement.
Dear Bay Weekly: My husband and I were fishing out on the Bay near the Eastern Shore on Sunday Nov. 14. We started noticing little spiders all over the boat. Then we saw spider webs on the rods and on the radio antenna. Then when the sun was just right, we saw hundreds of long spider webs floating in the air with the current. Some were up to 30 feet long. It was fascinating. Some of the spiders just fell right out of the sky. One landed on my husband’s head.
Dear Bay Weekly: As a transplanted St. Mary’s countian from little ’ol Ridge, I thoroughly enjoyed Margaret Tearman’s “Save the Turkey: Stuff the Ham” [Nov. 11: http://bayweekly.com/articles/food-and-drink/article/save-turkey-stuff-ham]. In anticipation of the holidays, families all over St. Mary’s spend many hours preparing this gastronomical treat. Over the years, I’ve written many stuffed ham articles and find Ms. Tearman’s piece an accurate and delightful read. By the way, corned hams are also sold by McKay’s Food Stores.
Dear Bay Weekly: EPA is requiring Maryland to create a Watershed Implementation Plan as a road map for cleaning up our waters. Maryland’s first draft was a good start. But there are key elements missing — namely how the state is going to achieve full implementation of the programs detailed in the plan. This is where you come in. Ask Governor O’Malley for greater detail on how the state plans to put the necessary programs and policies in place to reach clean water standards.