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Correspondence

Why Must There Always Be a Price Tag?

I’ve been waiting for the day that the town of North Beach sticks its greedy hand out to charge fun-loving people the privilege to run into the frigid Bay. Even though I have never (and will never) run into the cold water, I’ve enjoyed watching the antics of New Year’s revelers plunging in for the fun of it. And that’s the point: For the fun of it. Now it’s for charity. Why can’t something be done for fun? Why must there always be a price tag?
Bruce’s ingenious design of covering our glass-fronted Bay-front house with upturned decks is still working. Here’s how I covered up for Hurricane Sandy. Hope I don’t need to use it often. –Nancy Bauer, Deale Editor’s note: Nancy’s deceased husband Bruce Bauer wrote about his ingenious design in Bay Weekly back in the last century.

I voted in the early election voting. Not only that, I was an early election voting official, so I can imagine the energy going on all around me at the precincts as I write.     Many polls had people in Monday night, setting up the equipment, getting ready for the 7am Tuesday start.
    We love your newspaper here in North Beach. Could you put this tribute to Pat Carpenter, who died March 2, in your paper?     I feel like I’ve know Pat all my life, and that’s not so. The day I met Bob and Pat Carpenter, I instantly fell in love with them; they are like a ray of sunshine. They made my day every time I saw them. Pat was always so very positive in every endeavor, always thinking ahead for what’s good for Chesapeake Beach and North Beach.
I made an observation from home today that I thought I’d share. I live in Deale, and looking toward Holland Point in Herring Bay, I saw a towboat near what appeared to be a long rectangular object that I thought was partially sunken or sinking. It looked like one of those freighter shipping containers. Through binoculars, I saw a few people on board. The object had antennas up and it looked like a bilge pump was working, for a small stream of water was coming out the side.
Traffic is heavy and slow on the Osprey Highway to the Tropics, as my colleague Mark Martell calls Florida, Cuba and Hispaniola. We currently have one transmitter-carrying bird, Saco, in Florida; three — North Fork Bob, Snowy and Buck — in Cuba; and Katbird and Senor Bones in the Dominican Republic. Henrietta arrived in Colombia on Sept. 26, just nine days after leaving her natal area on Martha’s Vineyard. She’s now on the shores of the Gulf of Venezuela where Buck first settled in 2009.
I was stunned by the article [Sept. 22] reporting that Olive had been murdered. I appreciate being informed even though it was disturbing news. I attended a Chamber of Commerce cruise in late spring and picked up a business card that I shared enthusiastically with others, saying, Look, this bird has her own business card!
Great August 4 article on the Bay’s beacons and guardians for safety. The city of Annapolis holds title to the Thomas Point Light. When I was mayor, I was fortunate to sign the special papers for transfer from the federal government to the city with the Secretary of the Interior in a ceremony at City Dock.
Dear Bay Weekly:     I try to pick up the paper whenever I’m in the area. I’ve always found it really easy to read and to look at.     I was patronizing the Marriot in Annapolis on a recent Friday night — not because I’m part of the young singles crowd but because my girlfriends wanted to go to Pussers.     Out front, I picked up a copy of Bay Weekly.
Dear Bay Weekly:     I enjoyed your article on the cats meow http://bayweekly.com/articles/creature-features/article/weeks-creature-f.... Some years back I did cat rescue work with Linda Brown, a friend on the SPCA board. Together we neutered a lot of Eastport cats and found territories where they could be looked after. A network of residents around the city provided  health care services  for street cats out of their own pockets.