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Correspondence

However you play it, natural gas export is a high stakes game

     The biggest development proposed in Southern Maryland history looks much like a high-stakes game, with scenic Cove Point at the center of the board. At stake are millions of dollars in tax revenue, thousands of new jobs — and a quiet way of life Calvert County residents hope to preserve.

In 1937, 30-year-old school teacher Harriet Elizabeth Brown successfully sued Calvert County Schools for paying her about half as much as an equally qualified white teacher: $1,100 a year for white teachers, compared to only $600 for African American teachers. She surely never imagined that students of today would be inspired by her actions, much less that they would develop award-winning History Fair projects documenting her pioneering success. Yet that is exactly what has happened.

    Last Wednesday was not an ordinary day. It was 9/11 2013.

Bowie Garden Club and Library

    Invited by Bowie Library to fill 18 empty planters that adorn the parking lot near the entrance to the library on Annapolis Road, the Bowie-Crofton Garden Club held a planting party.     Patuxent Nursery donated the plants. On an absolutely wonderful day for planting, Garden Club members Marsha Salzberg, Rich Buller, Susan Livera, Jackie Streeks, Bob and Joan Walker, Linda Snow, Barbara Eberstein and Jessie Smith set to organizing them.
Sporting Life columnist Dennis Doyle wrote last week that the newly elected president of the Maryland Watermen’s Association, Robert T. Brown Sr. of St. Mary’s County, was apprehended by Natural Resources Police illegally setting nets off of Chapel Point State Park.     Those were fighting words to Mick Blackistone, executive director of the Association.      Blackistone:

Tiger the orange tabby cat has been the resident blood donor at Mid-Atlantic Animal Specialty Hospital in Huntingtown for the past five years, saving hundreds of animal lives with his blood. At the age of seven and too old to continue in the job, he’s retiring. Now the cat that gave so much needs a home.
The South County Democratic Club responded to President Barack Obama’s call for a National Day of Service on January 19 by organizing a food drive for the South County Assistance Network, SCAN.     We were honored to have our District 5 Congressman, Democratic Whip Steny Hoyer, join us to deliver food items.

Another year has gone by and it’s time for the new calendars to come out.     We start off with New Year’s Day, which is important for the New Year’s Eve revelers to wake up to a start of new year. The first holiday we see on the calendar is Martin Luther King Day, which the children have off from school. When I went to school, we had Lincoln and Washington’s birthdays off; now they are lumped together as Presidents’ Day.

Why Must There Always Be a Price Tag?

I’ve been waiting for the day that the town of North Beach sticks its greedy hand out to charge fun-loving people the privilege to run into the frigid Bay. Even though I have never (and will never) run into the cold water, I’ve enjoyed watching the antics of New Year’s revelers plunging in for the fun of it. And that’s the point: For the fun of it. Now it’s for charity. Why can’t something be done for fun? Why must there always be a price tag?
Bruce’s ingenious design of covering our glass-fronted Bay-front house with upturned decks is still working. Here’s how I covered up for Hurricane Sandy. Hope I don’t need to use it often. –Nancy Bauer, Deale Editor’s note: Nancy’s deceased husband Bruce Bauer wrote about his ingenious design in Bay Weekly back in the last century.