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Arts and Culture

Lincoln was the first to use photos to shape public perception

       Abraham Lincoln, whose leadership the country celebrates on Presidents Day February 19, a week after his February 12 birthday, ranks as one of our best presidents. He won the Civil War, saved the Union, ended slavery and uttered some of the most eloquent words ever spoken by an American leader. 

Chesapeake Bay Blues Festival ­honored for its commitment to the music

      Every year, the Chesapeake Bay Blues Festival donates its sizable profits to charity. And every year, fans of the music return to the shores of Chesapeake Bay at Sandy Point State Park for the festival that features strong lineups and standout performers. So it comes as no surprise that the popular festival was recently awarded the Keeping the Blues Alive Award from the Blues Foundation based in Memphis, Tennessee.

The acting is tight, the pace is fast, the one-liners fly and people die

      Take some Neil Simon-like one liners, add a dash of the door-slamming slapstick of Noises Off, mix with some World War II political intrigue, a bunch of mistaken identities and hidden passages in a dark mansion, and what do you get? The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940, running through February 24 at the Bowie Playhouse. 

Making beer is fun. Can it also be a means to make a living?

       For beer lovers, this is a heady time. Some 1.15 million Americans brew beer at home, in their kitchens, garages and porches, according to the American Homebrew Association. Most are guys, and most older than 30.        “Access to information and equipment has never been better,” says John Morehead, the Association’s competition director, noting that in those areas, “the lines between professional and amateur bleed into each other.”

"If we don’t tell these stories, no one will know what life was really like"

      Important African American history is being lost with each passing year. You can help preserve the past before it disappears forever by sharing a story about the civil rights era and historic sites in Anne Arundel County.       The Lost Towns Project wants to hear your stories about African American history for two grants sponsored by the National Park Service Civil Rights African American Historic Preservation Program and the Maryland Heritage Areas Authority. 

King’s words resound in drama and music this weekend

      Fifty-five years ago, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. proclaimed “I have a dream!” from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial. In honor of Martin Luther King Jr. Day in the 50th anniversary year of King’s death, those rousing words will resound in Annapolis.

She seeks success in high-stakes poker

     Molly Bloom (Jessica Chastain: The Zookeeper’s Wife) has impressive credentials. An Olympic-caliber skier and academic whiz on her way to Harvard Law School, she impresses everyone but domineering father (Kevin Costner: Hidden Figures). When her Olympic dreams crash, Molly abandons her father’s plan and heads to LA. 

A beautiful fairy tale for fish out of water 

     Orphan Elisa Esposito (Sally Hawkins: Maudie) knows hard times. Mute since a childhood throat slashing, she works as an unnoticed janitor at a secret government facility in Baltimore.       Her life ticks by in lonely minutes until agent Strickland (Michael Shannon: Nocturnal Animals) introduces an amphibious humanoid called the Asset. Worshiped as a god in South America, the Asset was captured to add to America’s Cold War arsenal. 

The force fully awakens in the space adventure we deserve

     Former stormtrooper Finn (John Boyega: Detroit) wakes from his coma to finds things looking dire in a galaxy far, far away.       Better financed and armed, the evil First Order is crushing the rebellion led by General Leia Organa (Carrie Fisher, in her final role). The rebels’ last fighters flee across the universe with the First Order hot on their heels.

Artist John W. ‘Bud’ Taylor inspired an ethic of land preservation

     Mayo resident John W. ‘Bud’ Taylor told us (https://tinyurl.com/BW-Taylor-99) that for him, being outdoors wasn’t exactly a drive. “It’s more a refreshment, like recharging your batteries,” he said. It turns out that it was actually Bud, who passed away at the age of 86 on Oct. 28, who was recharging our collective drive all these years to treasure and protect the Bay landscapes.