view counter

Recipes

The lessons at Anne Arundel Community ­College’s Culinary Institute will last well after the new yearBob Melamud

Food eaten between November 1 and New Year’s Day contains no calories. I suspect I’m not alone in honoring this conviction. Yet a lifetime of stepping on the scale January 2 has convinced me that our cherished belief is a cruel urban legend.     This year I faced an additional challenge. Our editor assigned me to take and report on an Anne Arundel Community College Culinary Institute holiday class. Biscotti, cookies, Scandinavian baking and truffles tempted me — and promised an overabundance of extra calories.

It wouldn’t be Thanksgiving ­without the sweet finale

Can Thanksgiving dinner be both wonderful and boring at the same time? I’ve been having the exact same Thanksgiving dinner for almost 25 years now, and it’s getting old. Every year it’s the same people, same place, same menu.     What’s changeable?     It’s family, so that’s not changing.     Turkey with stuffing, sweet potatoes, gravy and the trimmings are too traditional to change.

Bakers Thomas and Pam Storm of Great Harvest Bread Company

What inspires you?     We love all kinds of baked goods but particularly enjoy trying traditional breads from around the world. What’s your culinary background?     Thomas owned an ice-cream store in downtown Annapolis for 25 years before switching to bread. Where do you eat on a night off — at home or out?

Chef Zachary Pope of Roundz ­Gourmet Market and Catering
 

What inspires you?   I was inspired by working with great chefs in Washington, D.C.’s, fine-dining restaurants. They taught me to seek out unique ingredients and be fearless when it comes to creating. I’m also inspired by the wonderful fresh, local ingredients we have in this area.

Chef Michael Archibald of ­Herrington on the Bay and Honey’s Harvest

Four ways to cook the Bay’s favorite fish

What a year we’ve had for rockfish! In our fifth month of abundance, big fish are still just about everywhere in the mid-Bay, with anglers catching them using just about every method.     Eating fresh Chesapeake rockfish is one of the perks of living in the Tidewater. One of the many attributes of the fish is that its flavor can be influenced by the addition of easy-to-make sauces, which can give a fresh rockfish dinner a completely different taste each time you serve it.

A sweet ending to Maryland Buy Local

You ate all your locally raised vegetables, fruits, eggs and meat every day during Maryland Buy Local Week.     Now you can have dessert.     Naturally, it’s Maryland made, from the farmer to the chef to you.     At Governor Martin O’Malley’s sixth annual Buy Local Cookout, the sweetest thing on the menu was Chef Douglas Wetzel’s Gertrude’s Charolettetown Farm Ricotta Doughnuts with Peach Caramel Sauce.

Crabs, Watermelon and Great German Fare

It’s time to get cracking. This Friday, August 2, the Annapolis Rotary Club and its 150-plus members roll out the brown paper for its 68th annual World’s Largest Crab Feast at Navy-Marine Corps Memorial Stadium (5-8pm).     The feast is a highlight of summer, with all-you-can-eat steamed crabs, corn on the cob, crab soup, hot dogs, BBQ, soft drinks and beer.

Lose weight eating the Paleo Diet

It’s bathing suit season, and there’s no better time to fret about our waistlines than when they are hanging over our bikini bottoms. With obesity a recurring topic and increasingly dramatic health issue, the pursuit of the perfect diet continues. The Paleolithic or Paleo Diet has been buzzing around since the 1970s (while the real cavemen were munching the tundra over two million years ago) but has gained recent popularity. The premise is simple.

What I’ll be eating this Buy Local Week

In high Maryland summer, buying local is no challenge. Rain and sun, heat and humidity make the vegetable kingdom grow like it will devour tomorrow. Fields and farm markets are fecund with foods you’ve not tasted fresh since last fall. Corn, cucumbers, cantaloupe, peaches, peppers, squash, tomatoes and watermelon are ready or ripening.     If I were doing the naming, I’d call Maryland’s sixth annual Buy Local Challenge the Buy Local Opportunity.