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Eating Out

Galway Bay makes a splash big enough to celebrate 20 years

      It takes an Irish boat and crew to ferry beer across the Chesapeake. They won’t be dying the Chesapeake green — as the Irish of Chicago dyed the Chicago River for St. Patrick’s Day — but they’ll be transforming the Bay into an Irish Channel to bring Galway Bay its special 20th anniversary brew. 

This couple sets the bar high for local eateries

     It’s a rare week at Bay Weekly when we don’t get a press release proclaiming the opening of a regional or national chain restaurant. The release is a metaphor for the restaurant it touts. Produced at a corporate headquarters far away, with minor changes to make it appear local, it touts a menu and food you could just as easily find in Columbus, Ohio.

Let someone else do the cooking

      Perhaps this is the year you’d prefer to give thanks for not cooking? Bay Weekly has gone hunting to report where you can eat out on Thanksgiving and what’s on the menu.   Brian Boru Buffet-served carved turkey, giblet gravy, ham, roast beef, filet of fish with lemon, shepherd’s pie; multiple side dishes; pecan and pumpkin pie, traditional Irish bread pudding.

Version 2018 blends old with new

       Annapolis Market House has been trying to reinvent itself — and failing — since the old Market House closed at the end of 2004.        Version 2018 has just opened, drawing me back to a scene I visited in 2013 to review Amsterdam Falafel House, the first business to open in Market House that year. A lot is old about the new Market House, but what’s new makes it a place I want to patronize.

Come April 20, the outdoor ­calendar starts filling up

         Spring is on the calendar. We had another lovely taste of warm weather last week. Yet the forecasters say not to pack away the winter gear as the thermometer struggles to reconcile with our expectations of spring.          Prepare your sacrifices to the weather gods, for as April moves forward, more and more outdoor events call us out of hibernation.          Here’s a look at some of the reasons to pray for warm weather.

A memorable run at family landmark

     Ted Levitt, proprietor of Chick & Ruth’s Delly on Main Street in downtown Annapolis, spent his last day at work doing what he always has: seating customers and smiling a lot. 

Mamma Lucia’s opens its third ­restaurant in Chesapeake Beach

     Call it a labor of love three years in the making. Mamma Lucia by the Bay opened on Monday, August 21 to the excitement of restaurant-goers in Calvert County and beyond.       The Tuscan-orange building has the distinction of being Chesapeake Beach’s only two-story restaurant with a rooftop deck. Outdoor dining is available on both the deck and a patio. 

The popular chain helps anchor Annapolis Towne Centre

Hard to believe it’s been eight years since the Annapolis Towne Centre (ironically in Parole) opened its many tenant doors, expanding the retail topography of the greater Annapolis landscape. Here, as in Waugh Chapel, developers Greenberg Gibbons have made a success embracing the build-it-and-they-will-come methodology.     There has been a fair amount of evolutionary turnover, but the big boys — anchors Whole Foods, Target, P.F. Chang’s and Brio Tuscan Grill — have remained.

Welcome to Bay Weekly’s annual Dining Guide, a tour of good eats and good eating. In this special, you’ll visit the many restaurants, delis, groceries and seafood markets whose advertising in our pages brings you Bay Weekly 52 weeks of each year. Most are locally owned, and all are in our neighborhoods.
    Each is unique in its offerings — from fin- and shellfish fresh from the Bay to fine beef to satisfying preparations and presentation whether home style or exotic to regionally famous wines and beers to inventive cocktails.
    Read, explore, enjoy — and as you taste your way to new knowledge, please say I read about you in Bay Weekly.


The Inn at Pirates Cove

Many local chefs and restaurants are on the bandwagon

     Farm-fresh fruit and vegetables plus fin and shellfish straight from the Bay abound in midsummer Maryland. Farmers markets, roadside stands and grocery stores all sell local produce.     But will you fare so well when you go out to eat?     Yes — if you know where to look.