view counter

Cooking

Local family adds meat to your Eat Local repertoire

     Fourth-generation Anne Arundel County farmer Deana Tice wants to bring out the carnivore in your locavore.       “Most families don’t have the farm connection any more. Everyone needs to know where food comes from and how it’s raised,” she says. So Tice has made it her mission to “share our farm and agricultural lifestyle as much as possible.”

How to ace summer’s BBQ competition

 

     Step outside on any warm Maryland evening, and there is a very good chance you will find the aroma of food cooking on a neighbor’s grill. We have a love affair with grilling and barbecuing. Almost six percent of us grill more than once a week.

Freshly dug potatoes from your ­garden will spoil you

      Visiting Provence, France, many years ago, I was overwhelmed by the potatoes in the farmers markets. I saw so many beautiful varieties of potatoes, including bright red ones, soft pink ones, dark blue, lavender, yellow and all shades of brown. As well as colors, potatoes come in many shapes, including petite tubular potatoes known as fingerlings. Today you can find many of these different varieties in most grocery stores.

An international taste of the holidays

      In the great American melting pot, many families have a specialty that makes the holidays taste like home. Many of these recipes were passed down by family members who immigrated to the U.S.        Bay Weekly reached out to our friends and neighbors to see what food and drink from around the world are featured on their tables. We’re happy to share their treasured recipes with you.  

Recipes from pros and prizewinners

      If there’s any day to bridge the gaping American divide, it’s Thanksgiving. On that great American feast, consensus rules. Eighty-eight percent of us report that turkey will be our Thanksgiving dish of choice, according to the National Turkey Federation. Certainly for me, one of the great pleasures of the day is the near unanimity of sharing in one great meal, all across the nation. 

Prize-winning recipes for the ­Chesapeake’s beloved bivalve

      Oysters are ours to eat again.       True, aquaculture ends the traditional summer drought, making oysters accessible all year long.
Behind the scenes at the National Oyster Cook-Off
Marty Hyson:  Smoked Chardonnay Oysters First Prize Hors D’Oeuvres; Best Presentation;  People’s Choice

from John Shields’  Chesapeake Bay Cooking

     “I traveled around the world in search of fine cuisine only to learn that some of the finest eating to be found was in my Chesapeake homeland,” writes John Shields. As author of Chesapeake Bay Cooking, host of the PBS show Coastal Cooking with John Shields and proprietor of Gertrude’s Restaurant at the Baltimore Museum of Art, Shields has introduced the world to his native cuisine. 

Add this year’s National Champions to your menu

     How do you like your oysters? Fresh, raw on the half shell? Steamed over coals in the shell and eaten buttered? Patted in cornmeal and fried?      For most of us, simplicity and tradition equal perfection.      But we humans are innovators, so each year’s blessing of oyster bounty brings this tantalizing question.

Time, not effort, yields top-notch results

We find corned beef at delis, restaurants and at this time of year in groceries ready to boil for St. Patrick’s Day. This year I made it at home.     Do-it-yourself corning is neither complex, expensive nor labor-intensive. The challenge is finding the right containers for curing and cooking the beef. And maybe finding the refrigerator space.     There is nothing magical about the brisket. The traditional weight is six to eight pounds, but the recipe is just as successful with a smaller piece of meat.