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Food and Drink

Low Country cuisine in ­Chesapeake Country

     Thanksgiving is by tradition a gathering of people for a feast that shares their cultures.       If you come from Daufuskie (say Daw-Fo-skee) Island, as Shady Sider Emily Bryant does, you’d be sharing Gullah culture in such Low Country dishes as Daufuskie deviled crabs and Gullah stew.

Odes to family, comfort

     At a moment of fraying connections, of nose-in-the-phone solitude and epidemic loneliness, Chesapeake Country offers one enduring remedy — the oyster.     Oysters are a great foodstuff of Maryland history and a treasure of our waters. But they’re also sinew in what binds families over generations, proved in the winner’s circle of the Annual National Oyster Cook-Off, part of Rotary Club of Lexington Park’s 53rd U.S. Oyster Festival in St. Mary’s County last month.

If the food is good, most anything else can be forgiven

     The holiday commemorating the first communal meal with native Americans and the early colonists now brings families together to enjoy a feast. I strive to gather our Thanksgiving meal from our garden and to include free-range poultry. I also like to use ingredients and recipes that our foremothers and fathers would have used.      On this holiday for memories, many rise from the creation of the annual feast. Catastrophes in their time are now family legend.

Galway Bay named Best in the Americas

      The Irish experience at Galway Bay is the real deal: The bar was built in Ireland and shipped to Annapolis. Six Irishmen came to the States to install the custom-made bar, which features dark wood and glass shelving.          As much thought as went into the design of the bar itself went into the decision about what to stock.

Latin-themed market opens Saturdays in August and September

      A new farmers market with a Latin flavor opens in Annapolis next week. As well as fruits, vegetables, flowers and plants from local farms, Mercado Hilltop will sell handicrafts, piñatas, art and more. The open-air market starts August 10 in the parking lot of the Salvation Army on Hilltop Lane. The market will be open, weather permitting, every Saturday through September 28.

Local family adds meat to your Eat Local repertoire

     Fourth-generation Anne Arundel County farmer Deana Tice wants to bring out the carnivore in your locavore.       “Most families don’t have the farm connection any more. Everyone needs to know where food comes from and how it’s raised,” she says. So Tice has made it her mission to “share our farm and agricultural lifestyle as much as possible.”

How to ace summer’s BBQ competition

 

     Step outside on any warm Maryland evening, and there is a very good chance you will find the aroma of food cooking on a neighbor’s grill. We have a love affair with grilling and barbecuing. Almost six percent of us grill more than once a week.

New Crooked Fest is an old school good time

A Bay Weekly conversation with Crooked Crab Brewery founder Daniel Messeca

 

Bay Weekly Crooked Fest June 1 is a whole new entry in Chesapeake Country’s calendar of festivals. Tell us its story. Daniel Messeca My partners in Crooked Crab Brewery and I wanted to create a really fun event to celebrate our other two great loves besides beer: music and community.

2019 love stories get no help from SweetHearts

       Valentine’s Day is estimated to generate more than $1.8 billion in candy sales. Most popular of those candies are conversation hearts, the little hearts with cute sayings on them: Be Mine, Marry Me. Even heart-shaped boxes of chocolates were overtaken by the little sugar hearts.          Now SweetHearts, the most popular brand of the most popular Valentine’s candy, are no longer being made.
      Welcome to Bay Weekly’s ­annual Dining Guide, a tour of good eats and good eating. In this ­special issue, you’ll visit the many restaurants, delis, groceries and seafood markets whose advertising in our pages brings you Bay Weekly 52 weeks of each year. Most are locally owned, and all are in our neighborhoods.
      Each is unique in its offerings — from fin- and shellfish fresh from the Bay to fine beef to satisfying preparations and presentations whether homestyle or exotic to regionally famous wines and beers to inventive cocktails.
     Read, explore, enjoy — and as you taste your way to new knowledge, please say I read about you in Bay Weekly.
Angelina’s Italian Kitchen What’s your story?          Angelina’s Italian Kitchen, located on Route 214 in Edgewater, is a small, quaint carryout with four tables should you choose to eat in. Named after the owner’s great-grandmother, Angelina Canestra, who found so much joy in cooking for family and friends, the restaurant prides itself in serving all homemade Italian food daily.