view counter

Books

Interspecies relationships have shaped history

Brian Fagan, anthropologist and scholar (professor at the University of California Santa Barbara), is the author of this and other interesting and deeply researched books in the field of archeology. The complexity of relationships in his family menagerie inspired The Intimate Bond’s history of how humans and animals have interacted from the Ice Age to modern times.     Interspecies relationships have shaped history as, for example, subsistence farming of meat animals gave rise to the first large human settlements, our cities.

Bay Weekly’s Summer Reading Guide

A good book can take us farther than an airplane, keep us otherwise occupied longer than a week away from home and cost far less than any vacation. True, I’d rather be reading my book on a sandy beach with an ocean breeze. But even on my own back deck, lolling my cushy birthday chaise, a good book, a summer’s day and a cool drink make a vacation.     In that spirit, the Bay Weekly family of readers offers its annual summer reading special.

The Autobiography of Alice Dunnigan

Cove Point is getting attention for more than its great views, good fishing or the controversial topic of natural gas import and export.     Thanks to Carol McCabe Booker — a Cove Point resident for three decades — the bump in the Bay in southern Calvert County is becoming a research center on black journalism pioneers.     First McCabe Booker, a lawyer and journalist, partnered with husband Simeon Booker on his autobiography Shocking the Conscience, a black journalist’s first-hand account of the civil rights movement.

Connecting communities through King and art

Dr. Martin Luther King’s message will see you through any month of the year, as readers young and old will learn in Love Will See You Through. In it, King’s niece, Angela Farris Watkins, draws six principles the civil rights leader followed as he promoted peace and non-violence.

This weekend, meet author Gary Pendleton and the artists he covers

We English speakers lack words for what the French call plein air painting, the Italians al fresco and Spanish speakers al aire libre.     But fresh air painters we’ve got aplenty, as Gary Pendleton’s new book 100 Plein Air Painters of the Mid-Atlantic lavishly illustrates.     You see such painters in, excuse my French, plein air competitions throughout Chesapeake Country and across the land. One hundred in one place makes for an extraordinary visual experience.

Read the book, meet the author

Gardeners don’t need degrees in botany. But knowing a little botany — plus a bit about the history of human relationships with plants — creates a deeper gardening experience. Just ask local author Ruth Kassinger.

The healing power of a good story

Bob Timberg has a face you don’t forget.     How the U.S. Naval Academy graduate and Marine first lieutenant — handsome son of a mother who was a McCall’s cover girl at 13 — got that face is a question you don’t ask.     Yet now, “as I edge into my seventies,” Timberg says, he has written a book revealing the whole story.     “I had third-degree burns, the skin … totally destroyed, top to bottom,” he writes.

Still time to escape in a good book

     With half of summer stretching before you, there’s still time to get lost in a good book.     Armchair travelers stretch our confined worlds with books that take us places we’ll probably never see on our own. Certainly not with the open-eye and open-heart clarity of the ­writers we love best.

Mine makes 15,001

     Five years ago in Wisconsin, Todd Bol built a model of a one-room schoolhouse as a tribute to his mother, a former teacher. He installed it on a post in his front yard and filled it with books to give away. It was such a hit with his neighbors that he built and gave away several more, each with a sign that read free books.

You can get (most) anything you want — even a good book

If the medium is the message, then there’s more to be learned from Calvert Library’s huge festival of local authors than you’ll read in this week’s feature story, The Writers Next Door.     Your neighbor may have written just the one for you, I say, introducing 33 authors and their latest (or favorite) books. These are quick introductions, the literary equivalent of speed dating, with a life compressed into one sentence and a plot into another. At the May 31 festival, you’ll meet even more authors from 9:30 am to 4pm.