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Regulars (All)

Follow the birds to find the action

     We were at warp speed approaching Man O’ War Shoals, a large oyster reef that stretches for over two miles some distance southeast of Baltimore’s Key Bridge. Col. Dennis Robinson’s 20-foot Sea Hunt center console was barely touching the water as we covered the distance to the wheeling and diving gulls that had located feeding rockfish there.
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This year’s roots and leaves will improve next year’s soil

     Don’t pull those annuals! When cleaning up the garden, either mow them down or prune them out. Allow the roots to remain in the ground to rot and leave behind nutrient-rich organic matter for next year’s crop. After the roots rot, they will leave behind tunnels for the roots of next year’s crop to follow penetrating deeper into the soil where there will be more water and nutrients.
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We’re not the only ones that bite at that delicacy

     Flipping my bait over the side, I spooled out line, letting my bait disappear into the shaded depths and off the down-current side of the Bay Bridge pier. The tide had been moving for under an hour; the gentle current was just slow enough to allow my hook to sink to where I hoped the rockfish were holding.
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Understanding plants' nutritional needs is the key to good gardening

     This year’s fruit on my American hollies is very heavy. That gives me a job to do. Unless I give them additional nitrogen by mid-September, their foliage will be yellow-green instead of a rich dark green that will better show off the bright red berries.
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As daylight and temperatures drop, fish alter their feeding habits

     Fishing, especially for rockfish, is about to get better. Decreasing temperatures mean that baitfish of all types —peanut bunker, silversides, anchovies, spot, yearling white perch and baby croaker — are moving toward deeper water.
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Don’t give up on that missed strike

      I sent the Rat-L-Trap sailing out over the water in the longest cast I could manage. Pausing for a slow four-count to allow the lure to sink near the bottom, five feet down, I began the retrieve with long upward sweeps of my rod, followed by brief pauses to allow the lure to descend back toward the bottom.
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You’ll have to call in the big guns with poison ivy and English ivy
     Late summer is the best time to kill poison ivy and English ivy. As both of these species have extensive root systems capable of regenerating from pieces of roots, they are nearly impossible to eradicate by digging them out of the ground. The heavy wax covering the leaves makes them difficult to chemically eradicate as well. An exacerbating factor with poison ivy is that mature plants generate seeds that can remain dormant in the soil for years....

Turns out it’s complicated

     I was casting to a rip-rapped, Bay shoreline laden with the remnants of an aged dock. There were multiple piers, railings and decks, long fallen into total disrepair. Curiously, there were no nearby buildings of any kind that explained the structure’s presence. It was, however, a white perch playground.
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Try some of these gatekeepers
     Readers are complaining that rodents and deer are feasting in their gardens. 
     There is nothing like a good dog for keeping rabbits, groundhogs and deer out of the garden. Best is a dog that prefers staying out all night guarding the house and garden. Since we have had our dog Lusby, we have not had any four-legged pests feasting in the garden.
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Don’t set your watch by a fisherman

     We had timed our launch to take advantage of the tidal current change. As it usually takes about an hour after the scheduled low for the current to gradually stop, then another hour for the incoming current to become noticeable, we intended to exploit that two-hour period of slower water. That made our launch time about 8am for targeting the Bay Bridge.
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