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Bundle up, pack a long rod and head to Sandy Point

      The first signs of the spring rockfish run come to Sandy Point and Matapeake parks. Surf rods, some of them 12 to 14 feet long, will be strung out, poised in rod holders along the pier and beaches. Bundled up in insulated winter coats and camouflaged hunting attire and settled in on aluminum lawn chairs, these anglers have found the cure for cabin fever.
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The count has started: Get ready …

     You may not be able to wet a line in February, but you can immerse yourself in Maryland fishing shows.
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Peter Jackson uses technology to breathe life into 100-year-old history
      In 1914, the men of the United Kingdom were called to war. They signed up by the thousands, men and boys as young as 14 joining the British armed forces with hopes of distinguishing themselves. 
     They thought it would be an adventure: their chance to become like the heroes they read about in books.
     The reality, however, was different.
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The ice is thick and the fish are ­biting at Deep Creek Lake 

    Got a mid-winter hankerin’ to tangle with a five-plus-pound walleye? How about a citation-sized yellow perch, crappie or bluegill? If that doesn’t tempt you, how about some big smallmouth and largemouth bass, trout or a fat winter pickerel?
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The first fish of the year start ­moving in February

     Yes, I know temperatures have plunged into single digits lately. It’s best to consider these events as just the last freeze before the thaw. 
      The days are getting longer, and already a number of finned species are beginning to respond. February is only a week away, and that’s when yellow perch begin staging to ascend the tributaries to spawn. That’s a cause to rejoice.
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Wildlife photographer Jack Turner captures nature’s hidden gems

      Many of Maryland’s hidden gems, its wild wetland birds and animals, are not-so-obvious treasures that few of us fully notice. Unless you’ve the fiery curiosity of youth coupled with the unusual desire to brave hungry mosquitoes, gnats and biting flies, you’ll usually be unaware of the many species of hawks, herons, owls, kingfishers, waterfowl and even the eagles that reside and flourish among the Chesapeake’s wetlands.
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Being in shape is not an option for sportspeople; it’s a necessity

      As I walked down a row of cornstalks a half mile long and firmly grasping the seven-pound shotgun in my arms, my breath in the 10-degree air was coming a little harder with each step. I slowed my pace to keep abreast of my two partners, and we continued to push out that last narrow growth of corn, all that remained of a crop that was in the final stage of harvest....

Make 2019 your year to start a garden

      I recently returned from a vacation to Greece, specifically, the remote island of Ikaria in the northeast Aegean Sea. My ancestral home, it is designated a Blue Zone by National Geographic’s Dan Buettner.
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Why hunters love the ancient sport

      Someone in our blind hissed, “Four coming in, right in front. ” We had been straining our eyes for almost an hour, peering out over a broad river for a sign of waterfowl, and now these had appeared as if from nowhere. My hand eased toward my long black Benelli leaning in its perch along the front of our hide.
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If you’re not a fanatic yourself, I offer a few suggestions
      Christmas shopping for a dedicated angler is tough. 
      As editor Sandra Martin wrote a couple weeks back, “Sporting Life columnist Dennis Doyle regularly warns against giving tackle to anglers. Why? Because unless you’re as expert as they are, you’re vulnerable to making a choice they’ll scorn.”
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