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Features (News)

Hockey fans celebrate at their favorite watering holes

Fans of the Washington Capitals hockey team are having a smashing time. With a star-studded roster and a feared offense, the Caps have dominated their National Hockey League division for months and all but clinched a spot in the playoffs, beginning in mid-April.
    Fans don’t need to brave the crowds at Verizon Center to watch their favorite team skate on to another victory. Area bars make it easy to cheer for the team.

There’s help out there

The April 15 deadline to file your taxes is creeping closer. Need a little guidance and direction getting your taxes prepared and filed? Several organizations and agencies can assist — sometimes for free.
    The Comptroller of Maryland’s staff helps by phone (800-MD-TAXES), email ( or in person at one of the branch offices in Annapolis, Upper Marlboro or Waldorf.

Smithsonian Environmental Research ­Center in for the long haul

If you’ve ever planted a tree in your back yard, you’ve experienced the thrill of watching it grow from a ­knobby sapling into a towering oak or weeping willow. Multiply that by 20,000, and you’ll have some idea what Smithsonian ecologist John Parker is doing in his experimental forest in Edgewater.

Among your wait staff are bats, hamsters and killer whales

Spirited conversation keeps the atmosphere companionable at Zü Coffee, home of the friendliest wait staff as voted by readers of Bay Weekly. At the Waugh Chapel location, customers chat with the staff about their spirit animals.

The Bay’s 19 riverkeepers are part of a worldwide force of 275

Unless someone like you cares a whole awful lot,
Nothing is going to get better. It’s not.

–Dr. Seuss: The Lorax



Actors aren’t the only ones dressing up for the play

When Colonial Players’ Boeing Boeing opened Friday, February 19, all eyes focused on the actors. And they’re the ones who’ll take the bows — or dodge the tomatoes — when the play is over.

Will Tubman be the first woman on U.S. currency?

Harriet Tubman’s portrait will be in our hands and wallets, if Congressman Chris Van Hollen and the Dorchester County Council get their way. Both have asked federal Treasury Secretary Jack Lew to make the Maryland-born abolitionist the woman promised to be featured on the next new $10 bill.

Building a future marine and ­maritime workforce

Finding a boat to steal your heart has always been easy in Chesapeake Country. Finding a new generation to build, run and repair those watercraft — and to master the science of water — that’s harder.
    “People started to ask, Who’s going to do this work? Where’s our work force for these jobs?” says Pam Ray, chair of the Eastport Yacht Club Foundation.

At Calvert Library Prince Frederick

After throwing off the shackles of slavery, many blacks in Maryland continued to struggle to meet the most basic needs. The changing face of America meant learning to rely on each other and not the master of a plantation farm. Because of this need, benevolent organizations, or secret societies, were formed.

Galesville’s Hot Sox field

Stand at home plate, close your eyes, tilt your head just right and you can hear the whoosh of a fast ball, the sharp crack of a wooden bat connecting for a line drive down centerfield and the echoes of cheering fans.