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Articles by All

Outlaws are marauding on the Chesapeake

The term waterman, unique to Chesapeake Bay, refers to a commercial fisherman harvesting oysters, blue crabs and finfish or otherwise making a living from Bay waters. Maryland has a 300-year tradition of this noble endeavor.

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I prefer mine straight

I have been asked by several gardeners to respond to the use of compost tea.    
    I have spent nearly 40 years researching composting and the use of compost for growing plants. As a result of many successes, I cannot over-emphasize the benefits of using compost in gardening.
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What you get when you come with us to the theater or to the movies

Theater-going is serious business by Bay Weekly standards — whether the action is live in local theaters or projected in huge images on the silver screen. Since our earliest days, both have had prominent place in our pages.
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Once upon a time with a duck called canvasback ...

From the North Beach boardwalk, where I take my morning walks, I have seen a small, mixed flock of Bay ducks, hanging close to the shore: mainly scaup, bufflehead, goldeneye and canvasback.  This is a tiny remnant of the vast flocks that once wintered here.
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A neighborhood walk can be a history lesson

In honor of Black History Month, Bay Weekly tracks down unsung African Americans behind some street signs.
    In our capital, many streets are footprints for the African American communities that developed in the late 1800s.
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Tips for surviving Chesapeake Beach Resort and Spa’s murder mystery weekend

As fans of murder and mayhem, fiancé Jack and I often spend weekends watching thrillers and mysteries. We consider ourselves quite the couch-potato detectives.
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In lean times, two Annapolis black history memorials win much-needed state support

In these times of withered wallets and skeletal budgets, African-American history has scored in state money. Two Annapolis landmarks — the Alex Haley-Kunta Kinte Memorial at City Dock and the Maynard-Burgess House on Duke of Gloucester Street — are slated for money toward renovations and repairs....

Teresa Chambers of Dunkirk is back at work as chief of the U.S. Park Police. Her swearing in January 31 by Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar not only returns her to the job she loves but also clears her name and vindicates her claim of wrongful dismissal. Chambers lost her job seven years ago after telling the Washington Post that funding cuts to her department could endanger public safety and national monuments.

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Stories of black history come alive in Maryland State Archives

The story of 14-year-old William Ross of Annapolis reads like an adventure straight out of a Robert Louis Stevenson novel. Late one winter night, William flees a life of hardship to hop a passing ship and begin a new life in the West Indies.
    Great stuff, until you read closer: William is a slave fleeing not for adventure but for his life.
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The cycle continues in the heavens and in distant galaxies

February’s full moon straddles Thursday and Friday, appearing equally large both nights. The actual moment of totality is at 4:36am Friday, when the moon is opposite the sun with earth smack-dab between the two.
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