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Articles by Sandra Olivetti Martin

How to tell a spooky story

We like to be scared. Maybe not too much, but enough to feel the chill of possibility in our bones.
    As chilling night temperatures tell us the frost is near, time has come to tell spooky stories.
    This week, Bay Weekly guides you to the haunts of Chesapeake Country in a special section of Halloween Tricks and Treats.
    We have a spooky story, too, imagined and written for you by Richard Johnson of Deale.
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Man-made reef alive with seed spat

A new oyster reef lies alongside the Bill Burton Fishing Pier in the Choptank River. Sportsman and Maryland outdoors writer for nearly half a century, Burton retired from the Baltimore Evening Sun and came to Bay Weekly. Over 16 years with us, Burton became increasingly adamant and outspoken about restoring the Chesapeake.
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This is the scary season

Timing is everything in the harvesting of figs. Take the fruit too early and you lose the sugar. Wait a moment too long, and the bugs — wasps, flies, ants and Hercules beetles — beat you to it. Or the squirrels, who I watched running up the hill with ripe figs in their mouths. This weekend, looking down on my tree from an upper balcony, I saw the dried-out stems and shriveled tops of the last of the fruit.
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It wasn’t so long ago that boating shifted from a way to earn a ­living to a sport and pastime

With sailing the rage all over the Chesapeake, waterfront communities organized sailing clubs, fleets and regattas for sport and competition.
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Common sense and caution help, but they may not be enough

The last thing we wanted to read was Bay Weekly’s ­October 3 story “On a Rock and a Hard Place: The Last Place in the World You Want to Take Your Boat.” Those nightmare memories didn’t need refreshing.
    That’s the kind of lament I’ve heard over the past week from people who know all too well the shock and painful aftermath of a hard landing.
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Ann-Wallis White floods the Caribbean with children’s books

The biggest catamaran at the U.S. Sail Boat Show is so highfalutin that only VIPs can board. Orion is reserved for the invited guests of Cruising World Magazine.
    You and seven friends could charter the 90-foot Catana — with amenities including four cabins, indoor and outdoor dining salons, Jacuzzi and crew of four — for a week in the Caribbean.
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How to get the most from the U.S. Boat Shows

Annapolis may call itself the Sailing Capital of the World, but the United States Boat Shows make it the Boating Capital.
    The Sailboat Show came first, introducing Chesapeake Country to in-the-water boat shows in 1970. The Powerboat Show came in 1972. For 40 years, the Sailboat Show has traditionally led, with the boats arriving the first full week of October.
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Study safe boating — online and free

Every voyage can lead to Scylla and Charbydis. Mariners have always known that monsters of the sea are both real and hungry. Smart — and lucky — mariners live to tell the tale.
    That’s the kind of boater you want to be.
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Who’d miss the greatest show in town?

Like carnivals and county fairs, the U.S. Boat Shows bring a welcome return of familiar pleasures.
    So I’m not going to look back at old editor’s letters as I write this week because no doubt I’ve said the same things before.
    That’s because I go to the Boat Shows for the same thrills every year.
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And avoid Stormwater Dumb Era

How high is your enthusiasm for celebrating Septic­Smart Week?
    I’ve been celebrating since Monday, when Septic­Smart Week began, because a septic system upgrade is a fix-up chore on my done list.
    My done list is short. Not for want of trying. The got-to-do list at the Martin-Lambrecht household keeps us jumping.
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